Manly

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Equine influenza – surveillance succeeding

Wednesday 1 Jan 2003

Dr Sharanne Raidal warns, only by containing the virus within a relatively small proportion of the total horse population, and allowing the disease to 'burn itself out', will we be successful in eradicating EIThe most recent Department of Primary Industries (DPI) figures suggest that, in NSW, there are 835 horses infected with Equine Influenza on 119 confirmed properties. An additional suspect 2900 horses on 319 locations are also in quarantine. Charles Sturt University (CSU) senior lecturer in equine medicine, Dr Sharanne Raidal says most importantly, the NSW Deputy Chief Veterinary Officer reports that every one of these cases has been traced from known contact with affected horses. This means that, to date, the disease has not escaped surveillance measures. Dr Raidal warns that only by containing the virus within a small proportion of the total horse population, and allowing the disease to "burn itself out", will "we succeeded in eradicating EI". Continued careful attention to quarantine restrictions and prompt identification of new cases is required for this to happen. A number of horses with high temperatures, but no known risk of disease, have been tested negative. It is important that all such horses are examined as part of routine, ongoing surveillance for spread of the disease.

Media Contact: Peter Andrea, 02 6338 4839

Media Note:

Infected properties include those at Aberdeen, Arcadia, Berry, Cattai, Charmhaven, Clarendon, Cooranbong, Eagleton, Eastern Cree, Glenhaven, Glenorie, Gloucester, Glossodia, Kulnurra, Kurrajong, Londonderry, McCullys Gap, Maitland, Moonbi, Moree, Moore Park, Mount Hunter, Muswellbrook, Palm Grove, Parkes, Pitt Town, Quakers Hill, Randwick, Raymond Terrace, Redfern, Scone, Terry Hie Hie, Timbumburi, Tintinhul and Wilberforce. For interviews with Dr Sharanne Raidal, contact CSU Media.

Twenty years worth celebrating

Wednesday 1 Jan 2003

Charles Sturt University (CSU) will next year celebrate 20 years of strategic higher education and applied research that is making a difference nationally and internationally. Celebrations involving students, staff, academics, graduates and the University’s research partners and institutions will be held at all campuses. CSU is extending a warm invitation to all communities in its footprint to become involved in the celebrations that will highlight its rapid growth and achievements during the past two decades. The first meeting of the 20th Anniversary Committee, chaired by CSU Vice-Chancellor and President, Professor Ian Goulter, was held on Wednesday 25 June, to commence planning for what is a significant year in the history of the University of inland Australia. Proclaimed in July 1989, CSU has evolved as one of Australia's largest universities, operating across inland New South Wales and delivering education and degree qualifications in many countries around the world.

Media Contact: Wes Ward, 02 6051 9906

Media Note:

Deadline looms for university scholarships

Wednesday 1 Jan 2003

New students to Charles Sturt University (CSU) wanting to apply for scholarships for the coming year will need to get their applications in before Monday 18 February. New students to Charles Sturt University (CSU) wanting to apply for scholarships for the coming year will need to get their applications in before Monday 18 February. The scholarships, which are offered through the Charles Sturt Foundation, are awarded to students who have demonstrated high levels of academic performance, leadership and motivation throughout their school careers. Some scholarships are also available for students undergoing economic hardship, are disadvantaged, are Indigenous or are undertaking distance education with CSU. In 2007, the Foundation provided 235 students with ongoing support for their University studies through the scholarship program.

Media Contact: Aimee Cook, 02 6338 4680

Media Note:

CSU appoints new facilities boss

Wednesday 1 Jan 2003

With a background in business planning and policy development, Mr Stephen Butt has been appointed the new Executive Director of Facilities Management at Charles Sturt University (CSU). Mr Butt, who is an experienced engineer and project manager, comes to CSU from the Greater Southern Area Health Service based in Wagga Wagga. The former fitter and turner who trained in Wollongong, has post graduate qualifications in engineering management. At CSU he will oversee the largest set of building projects ever embarked on by the University, with academic facilities and services and student residences worth $240 million being constructed over five years from 2007 on its campuses in Albury-Wodonga, Bathurst, Orange, Dubbo and Wagga Wagga. This includes nearly $45 million to be spent by 2009 on the expansion of the Albury-Wodonga Campus.

Media Contact: Wes Ward, 02 6051 9906

Media Note:
For interviews with Mr Butt, contact CSU Media.

Equine influenza – be vigilant and compliant

Wednesday 1 Jan 2003

A panel of CSU equine health experts, led by Director of Veterinary Science Professor Kym Abbott, outlined the status of the EI outbreak, how the highly contagious virus is transmitted and ways to prevent its spread through the nation’s equine population. Members of the Riverina equine community at a Charles Sturt University (CSU) Equine Influenza (EI) forum have been urged to work together so that NSW Department of Primary Industries (DPI) quarantine restrictions, imposed in response to Australia’s first EI outbreak, are upheld by everyone in the community. Participants emphasised that the disease poses a threat to all horses, ponies and donkeys. Around 130 people attended the forum which was organised in Wagga Wagga by the CSU School of Agricultural and Veterinary Sciences. A panel of CSU equine health experts, led by Director of Veterinary Science Professor Kym Abbott, outlined the status of the EI outbreak, how the highly contagious virus is transmitted and ways to prevent its spread through the nation’s equine population. CSU veterinary science lecturer Dr Sharanne Raidal stressed the importance of community vigilance and compliance to halt the advance of equine flu, which can be transmitted by humans, vehicles and equipment.

Media Contact: Peter Andrea, 02 6338 4839

Media Note:
For interviews contact CSU Media

Broadband on track

Wednesday 1 Jan 2003

CSU researcher and PhD student Mr Peter Adams.The Federal Government has finally got the plan right for the National Broadband Network (NBN) according to Charles Sturt University (CSU) adjunct researcher Mr Peter Adams. Mr Adams, who has studied household broadband adoption for the past seven years, said today's announcement by the Rudd Government that it would form a public-private partnership to build the NBN is the best outcome from what has been an issue poorly managed by successive governments."Having the Commonwealth control the building of such important national infrastructure will ultimately achieve the best outcome for broadband users by ensuring there is clear separation between the provider of the cables and the commercial companies who compete to service consumers.” The researcher from CSU's Centre for Research in Complex Systems warned the Rudd Government now has a big job: it will manage the building of the network, and needs to convince households they will be better off under the proposed NBN. "Research conducted at CSU in 2008 showed householders are not convinced they should spend their income on higher speed broadband.  Clear information must be provided to consumers about the benefits of NBN services."

Media Contact: Fiona Halloran, 02 6933 2207

Media Note:

Australia will pay for delay: CSU expert

Wednesday 1 Jan 2003

Professor Kevin PartonA leading climate change researcher with Charles Sturt University (CSU) believes delaying the emissions trading scheme (ETS) will cost every Australian in the long run. Professor Kevin Parton, a lead researcher with CSU’s Institute for Land, Water and Society, said the Federal government’s decision to delay the introduction of the scheme until after 2012 to wait and see what the rest of the world will do on carbon emissions was no reason to delay. “The three biggest polluters are USA, China and Europe. China is developing green technologies, and Europe already has an ETS. They are going to be way ahead of Australia,” Professor Parton said. “The media has greatly exaggerated the cost of an ETS to the public, leading to falling public support for the scheme. And the government doesn’t want to take the scheme to its first election.” Professor Parton said under ‘business as usual’ without an ETS, Australia can expect to double its average level of income by 2050. “But with the ETS this income doubling would be delayed only one year.”

Media Contact: Wes Ward, 02 6051 9906

Media Note:
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Canadian police study at CSU in Manly

Wednesday 1 Jan 2003

A group of Canadian police officers are at Charles Sturt University (CSU) in Manly this week undertaking a residential course as part of their

Bachelor of Policing

degree by distance education. The Head of the CSUSchool of Policing Studies

, Associate Professor Rosemary Woolston, said the study visit by the nine officers from three Canadian Police Forces -  Durham, Ottawa and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police – was being hosted by CSU's

Australian Graduate School of Policing(AGSP) in Manly in conjunction with the Manly Local Area Command (LAC). "The commander of Manly LAC, Superintendent Dave Darcy, has welcomed the Canadian officers to his command where they will observe local police in action," Professor Woolston said. "During their visit the Canadians, most of whom are Inspectors or Senior Sergeants, will provide a fresh set of eyes on policing problems in the Manly area, with a focus on drink-driving, other alcohol-related crimes, and homelessness. They have accompanied Manly police on patrol, have spoken to members of the community including local taxi drivers to gauge their observations about local crime, and have observed sessions at Manly Court. At the conclusion of their visit, the Canadians will present their findings to Superintendent Darcy and a panel of Manly community leaders."

Media Contact: Bruce Andrews, 02 63386084

Media Note:
Contact CSU Media to arrange interviews with Associate Professor Rosemary Woolston.

Chile disaster shows need for government planning

Wednesday 1 Jan 2003

The earthquake and tsunami that hit Chile on Sunday 28 February are reminders of the harshness of nature and the need for governments, emergency services and relief agencies to plan for natural disasters, says an expert in disaster management from Charles Sturt University (CSU). Mr Ian Manock, lecturer in emergency management at CSU’s Australian Graduate School of Policing, said that with a burgeoning world population and in spite of increasing technology, research shows that the incidence of damage to facilities and harm to people from the impact of natural and technological hazards is increasing exponentially. He said the disaster will no doubt have emergency service agencies in Chile pushed beyond their limits and the international community will be called on to assist.

Media Contact: Wes Ward, 02 6051 9906

Media Note:
For interviews with Mr Ian Manock in Bathurst,contact CSU Media.

Abu Dhabi police graduate at CSU in Manly

Wednesday 1 Jan 2003

Abu Dhabi police graduates with CSU Chancellor Mr Lawrie Willett, AO, (front row 2nd left).A contingent of police from Abu Dhabi, the capital of the United Arab Emirates in the Persian Gulf, were the guests at a special graduation ceremony and dinner at the Australian Graduate School of Policing (AGSP) at Charles Sturt University (CSU) in Manly on Wednesday 19 May. Ten officers from a group of 14 travelled to Manly especially for the ceremony to receive their Master of Arts (Criminal Intelligence) and Graduate Diplomas (Criminal Intelligence). CSU’s Mr Patrick Walsh, the course co-ordinator, said, “These officers were unable to attend the main policing graduation, but I am very pleased that the School was able to provide a special graduation dinner for them which the University’s Chancellor, Mr Lawrie Willett, AO, and the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic), Professor Ross Chambers, attended with Associate Professor Tracey Green, the Associate Dean of the Faculty of Arts (Policing and International). This ceremony was smaller than the usual CSU graduation, but it’s very special as the students have flown all the way from Abu Dhabi. They are accompanied by senior officers from Abu Dhabi Police, including the head of their training department. The AGSP and Abu Dhabi Police will meet before the ceremony to discuss how to expand this program.”

Media Contact: Bruce Andrews, 02 63386084

Media Note:
Contact CSU Media to arrange interviews with Mr Patrick Walsh.

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