Other locations

Viewing page 4 of 9: Previous | 2 3 4 5 6 | Next

CSU cricketers in the pink

Wednesday 1 Jan 2003

The Charles Sturt University (CSU) Cricket Club will be one of hundreds of community cricket clubs across Australia sharing in the Vodafone Sydney Pink Test phenomenon this year by participating in Pink Stumps Day on Saturday 18 February. This is an initiative of the McGrath Foundation and Cricket Cares, Cricket Australia’s community action program. The CSU Cricket Club coach and team manager, Mr Ali Syed, an adjunct senior lecturer in the CSU Faculty of Business, says the team is excited to take part in the event. “The team has been playing cricket for the last three years,” Mr Syed said. “It’s wonderful to be able to contribute to the community and, with regards to this event, to show that the students care about charity.”

Media Contact: Holly-Amber Manning, 02 6365 7813

Media Note:

The inaugural Pink Stumps Day was held in 2011, with 665 clubs uniting to raise over $550 000. With the Pink Test in Sydney now in its fourth year, the McGrath Foundation and Cricket Australia look to again spread the hot pink magic beyond the Sydney Cricket Ground and onto the pitches of McIvor Reserve, Benbow Street, Yarraville, Victoria.
 
The CSU Cricket Club is made up of students, alumni and staff at the CSU Study Centre in Melbourne and patron Professor Ken Dillon who is the Dean of Studies based at CSU in Wagga Wagga. For further inquiries, contact Mr Ali Syed on 0478 409 061.

Program to help young Tumut people

Wednesday 1 Jan 2003

An educational program designed to help local communities deal with confronting issues for young people will be discussed at a Charles Sturt University (CSU) public lecture in Tumut on Wednesday 14 September. The ‘Putting Youth in the Picture’ program was developed in regional Queensland and uses a series of authentic, confronting movie scenes to show how young people can make poor decisions that will alter their lives. CSU has been granted the first NSW licence to roll out the program to all local government areas across its regions. Manager of Residential Operations at CSU in Albury-Wodonga and Wagga Wagga, Mr Peter Bell, said issues presented include sexual assault, binge and underage drinking, and alcohol-fuelled violence. “This program is about empowering local communities through their local councils, schools or sporting groups to use the program’s resources to hopefully prevent their young people from getting into difficulties,” Mr Bell said.

Media Contact: Emily Malone, 02 69332207

Media Note:
The ‘ Putting Youth in the Picture’ public lecture will be held  on Wednesday 14 September at the Montreal Community Theatre, Russell Street, Tumut. The lecture is hosted by CSU and Tumut Shire Council. Read more about  the ‘ Putting Youth in the Picture’ The Manager of Residential Operations at CSU in Albury-Wodonga and Wagga Wagga, Mr Peter Bell is available for interview. Contact CSU Media.

CSU hosts second national summit on practice-based education

Wednesday 1 Jan 2003

CSU Vice-Chancellor Professor Andrew Vann will speak at the Education For Practice Summit in Sydney on 3-4 April.The Charles Sturt University (CSU) Education For Practice Institute will hold its second national summit on professional and practice-based education in Sydney on Tuesday 3 and Wednesday 4 April. Professor Joy Higgs, AM, the summit convener and Director of the Education For Practice Institute, said, “The summit provides a forum for university educators and researchers to address practice-based education challenges, examine advances in this field, and share good practices and models. The theme for this year is ‘Education for Practice, Work and Society’, and leading academics from Australia, including Professor Andrew Vann, the new Vice-Chancellor and President of Charles Sturt University, are keynote presenters at the summit.” Other presenters include CSU Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic) Professor Ross Chambers, Professor Joy Higgs (CSU), Dr Franziska Trede (CSU), Professor David Boud (UTS), Professor Stephen Billett (Griffith University), Professor Jan Orrell (Flinders University), Dr Dale Sheehan (Canterbury University, NZ), and Ms Suzi Hewlett from the Department of Industry, Innovation, Science, Resources and Tertiary Education.

Media Contact: Bruce Andrews, 02 63386084

Media Note:
Contact CSU Media to arrange interviews.

What happens to an ageing brain?

Wednesday 1 Jan 2003

Dr David HAmlin.“One of the greatest challenges of modern neuroscience is understanding what happens to the brain as we age and why it becomes vulnerable to diseases such as Alzheimer’s,” said Charles Sturt University (CSU) researcher Dr Adam Hamlin. Dr Hamlin, from CSU’s School of Biomedical Sciences,  will talk about our Amazing Brain in a free public lecture in Griffith on Wednesday 15 August. Almost 280 000 Australians suffer from dementia and that figure is expected to rise as the population ages. Dr Hamlin will outline current breakthroughs in our understanding of the processes that occur in neurodegenerative diseases and what scientists are doing to find potential treatments for these conditions. A national Health and Medical Research Council Fellow, Dr Hamlin is carrying out research to discover more about brain cell death in people with Alzheimer’s disease.

Media Contact: Emily Malone, 02 69332207

Media Note:

Launching Smart Learning at CSU

Wednesday 1 Jan 2003

Professor Garry Marchant.A program to advance Charles Sturt University (CSU) as a leader in higher education teaching and learning will be launched in Bathurst on Tuesday 17 September. CSU Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic), Professor Garry Marchant, said, “Given the ongoing growth of student numbers and evolution of the higher education sector due to theoretical and technological developments, the launch of ‘Smart Learning’ will enable a stronger professionalised teaching focus to improve student engagement and maintain high-quality teaching standards at the University. With the implementation of Smart Learning, Charles Sturt University will lead the way in higher education learning and teaching innovation.” Information about Smart Learning and the next steps in establishing this program will be presented at the launch at The Grange, CSU in Bathurst at 3pm on Tuesday 17 September.

Media Contact: Bruce Andrews, 02 63386084

Media Note:
Contact CSU Media to arrange interviews with Professor Garry Marchant.

It's GameOn for high school students

Wednesday 1 Jan 2003

High school students in the NSW Mid-North Coast, central and southern NSW and regional Victoria can learn vital life skills while running a simulated business in an online game to be hosted by Charles Sturt University’s Faculty of Business. The GameOn! organisers at CSU are now calling for teams of Years 10 and 11 students from high schools around regional NSW and Victoria to participate in the game in 2013. The game was first staged in 2012.The student teams will make vital business decisions about marketing, human resources, operations and finance for an online, simulated business. Apart from developing problem-solving skills in their businesses, GameOn allows students to develop important life skills such as leadership, group work, critical thinking, negotiation and time management,” said GameOn coordinator Dr Abbey Dwivedi.  Teams will need to be nominated by the extended deadline of Friday 5 April, with eight rounds of ‘decisions’ to be made during the year and winning teams due to be announced in September 2013.

Media Contact: Wes Ward, 02 6051 9906

Media Note:

Contact CSU Media to arrange interviews with GameOn coordinator Dr Abbey Dwivedi at CSU in Albury-Wodonga, as well as co-coordinators Associate Professor Mark Frost in Bathurst and Dr Padma Nathan in Wagga Wagga.
 
 
GameOn! winners in 2012 were Port Macquarie High School (overall winners and Mid-North Coast NSW region prize), All Saints College Bathurst (Central West NSW prize), Cootamundra High School (Riverina NSW prize) and Wodonga Secondary Senior College (Southern NSW and regional Victoria prize).

Stories of the fall

Wednesday 1 Jan 2003

If you are over 65 and you have had a fall in that past 12 months, or are a relative or friend of someone who has, you can take part in research at Charles Sturt University (CSU) that looks at your experiences related to the fall. Ms Kristy Robson, a podiatry academic with the CSU’s School of Community Health  and Centre for Inland Health is looking for participants specifically from Albury, Corowa, Wagga Wagga, Griffith, Coleambally, Boorowa, Young and Moama as part of her PhD research project. Ms Robson, who is based in Albury, said it is estimated that between 30 and 60 per cent of older people living in the community will experience a fall each year. “It is therefore important we try and understand why this is occurring, particularly for people living in inland communities of Australia. Most current research is based on the opinions of health experts. We want to collect stories from diverse inland communities which have widely spread people and health services. Programs developed for metropolitan situations might not be appropriate for our regional communities.” To participate in the CSU research project, contact Ms Wendy Rose Davison on telephone (02) 6051 9232.

Media Contact: Wes Ward, 02 6051 9906

Media Note:
To interview Ms Kristy Robson on her falls project and get photographs, meet at 10.30am on Thursday 28 July behind the CSU Health Laboratories, Building 666 on the University’ s Thurgoona site, Broomfield Court, off Shuter Avenue, Thurgoona.

More than finding a job

Wednesday 1 Jan 2003

Questions about student career development and work opportunities are explored daily by the Careers Service at Charles Sturt University (CSU). However a free public lecture to be held in Deniliquin on Wednesday 20 July takes the question of career development further to explore a student’s sense of purpose. Hosted by CSU and Deniliquin Council, the lecture will be presented by Mr Paul Worsfold, a Career Development Officer at CSU in Wagga Wagga. “The focus of our Careers Service has shifted from a traditional role of simply preparing students for graduate employment opportunities to career development work starting soon after students enrol at university, if not sooner,” said Mr Worsfold. “Now we explore a student’s ‘sense of purpose’ and what is known as a ‘sense of agency’ or becoming one’s own agent for achieving life, learning and work aspirations. So career development, ‘sense of purpose’ and ‘sense of agency’ are all key aspects supporting student retention. The work of the Careers Service, its use of career action plans, tools for student reflection and a little research, all indicate that career development learning is more than helping students to find a job.”

Media Contact: Fiona Halloran, 02 6933 2207

Media Note:

The lecture, Career Development Learning: Sense of Purpose, Sense of Agency, and Student Retention will be held from 6pm in the Deniliquin Council Chambers, Civic Place, Deniliquin. CSU wines and cheeses will be served after the lecture. Career Development Officer at CSU in Wagga Wagga Mr Paul Worsfold is available for interview. Read more about the University&rsquo

Casella art competition

Wednesday 1 Jan 2003

Head of the CSU School of Visual and Performing Arts and judge of the 2009 Casella Art Prize, Associate Professor Margaret Woodward and artist Mr Warren Lane in front of his winning painting The Accidental Activist.Melbourne artist Mr Warren Lane has been named the winner of the 2009 Casella Art Prize at the Griffith Regional Art Gallery. Judge and Head of the Charles Sturt University (CSU) School of Visual and Performing Arts, Associate Professor Margaret Woodward, selected Lane’s work, The Accidental Activist to win the $2 500 Casella Art Prize for Excellence in Painting. "The exhibition's theme of urban and built environment has an important role to play in how we understand and reflect the places we inhabit, visit and construct,” said Professor Woodward. “Skilfully executed and very firmly set in an urban environment, Lane's painting invites us to consider the tension between the natural and built environment and to be mindful of the natural world in contemporary urban life.” Now in its fourth year, the Casella Art Prize aims to support new, emerging and established artists within Australia. The exhibition will run at the Griffith Regional Art Gallery until Sunday 26 April.

Media Contact: Fiona Halloran, 02 6933 2207

Media Note:
For interviews, contact CSU Media.

Valuing our natural places

Wednesday 1 Jan 2003

CSU PhD student Eloise Seymour.People in and around Maryborough and Castlemaine in Central Victoria will soon be able to have their say on how communities value natural assets. Charles Sturt University (CSU) researcher and PhD student Ms Eloise Seymour is hoping for over 500 replies to a mail survey she is sending out which will give her feedback on how people value local environmental assets such as the local Box-Ironbark Forests, the Moorlort wetlands, and the Loddon River between Baringhup and Vaughan Springs. “The Moorlort wetlands have been dry for 10 years due to the drought but local farmers have said how important they are for bird migration and how spectacular they used to be. Survey participants should consider how they value wetlands now and in the past,” Ms Seymour said. The survey, which should take 20 minutes to complete, will be sent to people living in small towns, regional centres, on farms and with special interests such as field naturalists. “The survey results will help develop better ways for environmental organisations in Australia to decide what natural places should receive government funding and resources,” Ms Seymour said.

Media Contact: Margrit Beemster, 02 6051 9653

Media Note:
For interviews with Ms Eloise Seymour on her research project titled ‘ Considering community values for natural assets in regional Natural Resource Management decision making&rsquo

Viewing page 4 of 9: Previous | 2 3 4 5 6 | Next