Other locations

Viewing page 5 of 9: Previous | 3 4 5 6 7 | Next

War on weeds in Central West

Wednesday 1 Jan 2003

The war against weeds in the NSW Central West continues and one Charles Sturt University (CSU) researcher is determined to help win the battle. A dominant weed in the region is serrated tussock, one of Australia's most noxious weeds estimated to cost NSW farmers more than $40 million each year in lost production. Dr Aaron Simmons from the University’s School of Agricultural and Wine Sciences will be talking at regional meetings organised by the NSW/ACT Serrated Tussock Working Party about results from research conducted over the past four years by researchers at CSU and the NSW Department of Primary Industries. “The research has been used to improve current guidelines on best management practice for controlling serrated tussock in native pastures,“ Dr Simmons says. “'Serrated tussock has no boundaries - it is not just a 'farmer's' problem, it's an environmental problem that belongs to the whole community.“

Media Contact: Holly-Amber Manning, 02 6365 7813

Media Note:
For interviews with Dr Aaron Simmons on serrated tussock research, contact CSU Media. Public meetings on the latest research on serrated tussock will be held at Euchareena on the Monday 11 May, Trunkey Creek on Friday 15 May, Goulburn on Tuesday 19 May and Nimmitabel on Thursday 21 May.   Interested attendees should check their local paper and ABC Radio for details.

A youthful voice for rural NSW

Wednesday 1 Jan 2003

2009 Sydney Royal Showgirl, CSU's Kimbalee Morris.For the second successive year, a Charles Sturt University (CSU) student has been selected as the Sydney Royal Showgirl. Twenty-one year old Ms Kimbalee Morris was named the 2009 Sydney Royal Showgirl during a ceremony on Saturday 18 April. Ms Morris, from Coonabarabran in Northern NSW, is a fourth year human movement student at CSU at Bathurst. “It was such a surprise, but I am so honoured to have been selected as an ambassador for both youth in agriculture and women in agriculture, and also for my local community. It is going to be a very busy 12 months but I am so excited by what is ahead,” said Ms Morris. As part of the title, Ms Morris receives $11 200 from the Royal Agricultural Society and The Land newspaper. She must also undertake activities as part of her role as an ambassador for rural NSW, including opening shows, public speaking events and promoting the showgirl competition. In 2008, pharmacy student at CSU at Orange Ms Anna Unger was named the Sydney Royal Showgirl.

Media Contact: Fiona Halloran, 02 6933 2207

Media Note:

Parents' turn to learn

Wednesday 1 Jan 2003

Parents of Newcastle senior high school students will be able to discuss life after high school with regional university advisers at the Hunter School of Performing Arts on Wednesday 21 April. Local mother of two, Ms Brenda Powell, whose youngest son is in Year 12 at the Hunter School of Performing Arts, believes the session will be of great benefit to anyone with a senior high school-age child. “It’s a great opportunity to look at the alternatives to our closer universities,” she says. “I don’t think a lot of people realise that regional universities can give their children a fantastic university experience. Living away from home means students can immerse themselves into university life and develop skills they wouldn’t necessarily get if they were living at home and just visiting the campus to attend lectures.” The Parent Information session is part of the Regional Universities Road Show which sees Charles Sturt University, Southern Cross University and the University of New England pooling resources to bring university information to those who need it.

Media Contact: Holly-Amber Manning, 02 6365 7813

Media Note:
The Regional Universities Road Show will be in Newcastle on Wednesday 21 April holding a Parent Information session from 6.00pm at the Hunter School of Performing Arts, Lambton Road, Broadmeadow. For interviews with CSU prospective student adviser Ms Fran Dwyer, or to arrange a photo opportunity, contact her on 0409 305 514 or fellow CSU adviser, Ms Katy O’ Brien, on 0408 274 332.

Improving Aboriginal mental health

Wednesday 1 Jan 2003

NSW Minister for Aboriginal Affairs and Minister Assisting the Minister for Health (Mental Health) the Hon. Paul Lynch.Charles Sturt University’s (CSU) Djirruwang Program Bachelor of Health Science (Mental Health) aims to create a critical mass of highly skilled Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander practitioners to deal with mental health problems in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities. This innovative program has been acknowledged by the NSW Minister for Aboriginal Affairs and Minister Assisting the Minister for Health (Mental Health) the Hon. Paul Lynch, who described is as a “significant commitment” by CSU. Mr Lynch’s comments came during the official launch of the NSW Aboriginal Mental Health and Well Being Policy 2006-2010 last week on CSU’s Wagga Wagga Campus. “The Djirruwang Program meets the national practice standards of the mental health workforce, making Charles Sturt University the first university course to use nationally agreed practice standards in mental health,” he said.

Media Contact: Peter Andrea, 02 6338 4839

Media Note:
Contact CSU Media for interviews.

New scholarships for regional learning

Wednesday 1 Jan 2003

Associate Professor John AtkinsonCharles Sturt University (CSU) will offer 20 scholarships that encourage joint studies between the University and TAFE colleges. The CSU Rural Learning Partnership Scholarships, each worth $2 000 for one year, are aimed at full-time students in need of financial assistance who are completing such courses such as the Bachelor of Business Studies in Griffith. Students with disabilities, from non-English speaking backgrounds or who are Indigenous are encouraged to apply for the competitive grants which can pay for accommodation, tuition fees, books and computers. CSU’s Head of School of Business and Information Studies, Associate Professor John Atkinson, said the Rural Learning Partnership Scholarships aim to redress some of the current financial inequities of tertiary study in regional Australia by helping students with genuine financial difficulties. The scholarships will be launched in Griffith on Thursday 20 November by CSU and NSW TAFE Riverina Institute at an integrated Business program information session.

Media Contact: Wes Ward, 02 6051 9906

Media Note:
For interviews with Head of the School of Business and Information Studies, Associate Professor John Atkinson, contact CSU Media. The integrated Business program information session will be held at the Gemini Hotel, Griffith, from 6 to 7pm on Thursday 20 November.

HRT reversal

Wednesday 1 Jan 2003

In what’s been described as a "U-turn of dramatic proportions", the same study that in 2002 warned menopausal women to abandon Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) has now released findings that show HRT risks are not as bad as first thought. The Women's Health Initiative Study (WHIS), a major 15-year research program to address the most common causes of death, disability and poor quality of life in postmenopausal women, last week stated any additional risks may apply only to older women. Charles Sturt University (CSU) biomedical researcher Dr Christopher Scott says he is not surprised by the new findings. “The initial findings were quite scary, but since then they have done a lot more thorough number-crunching. HRT is considered to be beneficial to deal with the symptoms of menopause, but a woman with a strong family history of breast cancer and cardiovascular should not take HRT long term. You have to look at the particular person and what they want to use it for and how long they want to use it.”

Media Contact: Elizabeth Heath, 02 6338 4787

Media Note:
Dr Christopher Scott is available for interviews, contact CSU Media.

Real world of work for young people

Wednesday 1 Jan 2003

Professor Smith says the majority of young people have a realistic view of the labour market.“Young people need no magic shields, swords and arrows to cope with the world of work,” according to Associate Professor Erica Smith, a specialist in vocation education and training from Charles Sturt University (CSU). Professor Smith says it is dangerous and futile to constantly make changes to the school curriculum in attempts to prepare young people better for the workplace. Her paper, The Land of Narnia or just the back of the wardrobe? What research tells us about the real world of work for young people will challenge many assumptions made about the nature of entry into work life for young people. Drawing from her national research, Professor Smith says the majority of young people have a realistic view of the labour market, hold sufficient skills to succeed and are able to move to full-time work seamlessly over a period of several years with no major difficulties. “The world of work, rather than being a strange land, difficult to enter, where battles are fought and special guides are needed, is a familiar and navigable place to young people,” she said. 

Media Contact: Elizabeth Heath, 02 6338 4787

Media Note:
Associate Professor Erica Smith will present her paper at the Australian Association for Research in Education conference from Monday 27 to Thursday 30 November. She is available for interview. Contact CSU Media.

Water politics in the pub

Wednesday 1 Jan 2003

CSU's Professor Shahbaz Khan.The Politics of Water - What Are the Real Issues? is the topic of a Politics in the Pub discussion by Charles Sturt University’s (CSU) Professor Shahbaz Khan in Sydney on Friday 10 November. Internationally regarded for his work in hydrology and water management, Professor Khan joined the University in the middle of 2004 when CSIRO Land and Water and CSU jointly funded the position of Professor of Hydrology to head up work in the critical research areas of land and water management. Having worked on nearly every continent of the world, particularly in developing nations, Professor Khan is the Regional Coordinator for UNESCO’s International Hydrology Program, HELP (Hydrology Environment, Life and Policy), based at CSU. Politics in the Pub started in the Harold Park Hotel in inner-city Glebe in 1988 and forums are held at 6pm each Friday in the Gaelic Club, Devonshire Street, Surrey Hills.

Media Contact: Wes Ward, 02 6051 9906

Media Note:
Contact CSU Media for interviews with Professor Shahbaz Khan.

National drama award for CSU academic

Wednesday 1 Jan 2003

Professor John Carroll receiving his Drama Australia award for excellence in Drama Education at the Turning The Tides conference held in SydneyThis year’s National Drama Australia Conference had more drama than usual for Associate Professor Dr John Carroll, who was named the recipient of the 2006 Drama Australia Award for Excellence in Drama Education. The Charles Sturt University (CSU) Associate Professor in Communication Research also launched a new book at the Turning The Tides conference which addressed such issues as online drama, digital performance and drama learning. Professor Carroll says Real Players? coauthored with David Cameron of CSU and Michael Anderson of the University of Sydney is “aimed at drama educators, secondary teachers and the university community, as well as a broader group of people who are interested in what’s happening in new technology and performance. It covers the shift that is going on in how young people are relating to new media, and how they are creatively using alternative channels of information.”

Media Contact: Elizabeth Heath, 02 6338 4787

Media Note:
Professor John Carroll is available for interviews. Contact CSU Media

Still just a load of hot air?

Wednesday 1 Jan 2003

"Australia is going to be one of the most severely affected countries by global warming," according to Dr Morrison.Carbon emissions trading is a great idea waiting to happen, according to Charles Sturt University’s environment economist Mark Morrison. Dr Morrison says he agrees with Prime Minister John Howard, who said at the APEC summit late last week that any carbon trading system would have to be global to suceed. “The global effort is going to be ineffective unless everyone is going to involved,” said Dr Morrison. “Very few countries are meeting their commitments under the Kyoto Protocol. Australia is going to be one of the most severely affected countries. The ability of agricultural land in Australia to produce the way it has historically is very unlikely, if you believe the global warming forecasts and I do.”

Media Contact: Elizabeth Heath, 02 6338 4787

Media Note:
Dr Morrison is available for interviews, contact CSU Media.

Viewing page 5 of 9: Previous | 3 4 5 6 7 | Next