Print page web address: http://news.csu.edu.au/local-news/wangaratta

Back to web page (non print view)

Wangaratta

Viewing page 1 of 1: Previous | 1 | Next

CSU helping people age well

Wednesday 21 Mar 2018

Are you aged 60 years or over and looking to maintain or improve your brain power or physical strength?

Academics from Charles Sturt University (CSU) in Albury-Wodonga are looking for participants in their ‘Ageing Well’ program which aims to enhance older people’s physical and cognitive abilities.

Participants will have access to allied health professionals such as occupational therapists, podiatrists and physiotherapists, who will support and supervise CSU students to deliver the weekly program.

Project coordinator and occupational therapist Dr Melissa Nott said, “Healthy ageing is more than increasing the number of life-years without disability. It’s about creating an opportunity for older people to actively participate in the everyday functional tasks that give their life meaning and value.

“We know that keeping active later in life brings incredible benefits for older people, in mental and physical wellbeing.”

Dr Nott, from the CSU School of Community Health, believes that working in community groups also enhances social connection and reduces feeling of isolation for older people.

“This project provides an opportunity for Charles Sturt University students to work in partnership with older people to assist them while gaining skills for their future careers as health professionals in regional areas.

“We are also keen for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged over 50 years to take part in the program.”

Participants will sign up for a one-hour session each Thursday for 10 weeks. The sessions will involve individual and group activities from Thursday 19 April 2018.

The program will be held in the Community Engagement and Wellness (CEW) Centre, Ellis Street, at CSU’s Thurgoona site.

For more information and to sign up for the program, contact Dr Nott on (02) 6051 9246 or send an email to ageingwell@csu.edu.au

Media Contact: Wes Ward, 0417 125 795

Media Note:

A media event announcing the project will be held with project coordinators Dr Melissa Nott and Dr Kristy Robson at 10am on Thursday 22 March in the Community Engagement and Wellness (CEW) Centre, Ellis Street, on the CSU site at Thurgoona.

For interviews at other times with Dr Nott or Dr Robson, contact CSU Media.

Albury launch for writing handbook

Tuesday 6 Mar 2018

A leading education researcher at Charles Sturt University (CSU) will launch a new book this week that recognises that young writers need support from a very early age.

Associate Professor Noella Mackenzie in the CSU School of Education located in Albury-Wodonga is the lead editor of the book and either wrote or co-authored 6 or the 13 book chapters in Understanding and supporting Young Writers from Birth to 8.
The book explores what it means to be a young child learning to write in the 21st Century.

“Writing has possibly eclipsed reading as the critical literacy skill for children to learn,” Professor Mackenzie said.

“The book fills a gap in literacy education, and provides practitioners such as early childhood and primary school teachers with the skills and knowledge they need to effectively support young children as they learn to write.”

The book will be launched by one of the NSW Directors of School Education in Albury, Dr Brad Russell, and CSU’s Head of the School of Education, Associate Professor David Smith.

Teachers, educators and interested members of the community from both sides of the border have been invited to the afternoon event. The launch will be hosted by the Albury Library Museum and sponsored by the local chapter of the Australian Literacy Educator’s Association.

In addition, the launch event will be attended by other co-authors of the book, who are all based at CSU in Albury-Wodonga, as well as some of the children who took part in research and provided pictures for the book.


  • Event details
    Where: Albury Library Museum, Kiewa St, Albury
    When: starting 4.30pm on Thursday 8 March

Read and hear further details here on the book Understanding and supporting Young Writers from Birth to 8.

Media Contact: Bruce Andrews, 0418 669 362

Media Note:

As well as attending the launch, Associate Professor Noella Mackenzie, who is based at CSU in Albury-Wodonga, is available for interviews between 9 and 10am on Thursday 8 March through CSU Media.

Public lecture on rights and innovation for older workers

Thursday 8 Feb 2018

Older workers in Australia are facing a ‘Catch-22’ situation.

“Workforce trends and government policy tell us we will need to work longer before achieving a well-earned retirement,” says Head of Campus at Charles Sturt University (CSU) in Albury-Wodonga, Dr Jennifer Munday.

“At the same time, many older workers report experiencing discrimination in their search for jobs.”

Dr Kay PattersonThe federal Age Discrimination Commissioner, The Honorable Dr Kay Patterson, AO, will address this dilemma and present some solutions in a free public lecture titled ‘Older Workers - Rights, Innovation and Inclusion’.

This free event will be held as part of the University’s Exploration Series at CSU in Albury-Wodonga on Tuesday 13 February.

“We invite the people of Albury-Wodonga and surrounding areas to meet Dr Patterson and hear about how we might resolve this dilemma,” Dr Munday said.

Dr Patterson will also discuss innovative opportunities for promoting the rights of older workers and creating an inclusive and productive workforce for Australia.

Event details:

When: 6pm - 7pm, Tuesday 13 February (followed by light refreshments)

Where: CD Blake Auditorium (Building 751, Room 104), CSU in Albury-Wodonga,
off Elizabeth Mitchell Drive, Thurgoona

Parking: Car Park 2

About the Exploration Series

The Explorations Series brings speakers from diverse disciplines to CSU campuses to share the latest ideas, thinking and opinions on contemporary social, scientific and cultural issues.

Media Contact: Wes Ward, 0417 125 795

Media Note:

Advice for parents on university options

Monday 18 Sep 2017

Parents of Year 11 and 12 students looking for guidance on the next steps for their children on their path to a university education can meet with representatives from Charles Sturt University (CSU) in Albury-Wodonga on Thursday 21 September.

"We believe that everyone should have the opportunity to attend university if they want to," said the coordinator of the CSU Parent Information evenings, Ms Katy Fardell.

"A degree can open up a world of possibility for a person's future career, community, and personal development.

"Parents play an important role in helping their child make that choice by providing advice, guidance and support as they consider their options as they approach the end of their schooling.

"That's why Charles Sturt University is giving parents the opportunity to get first-hand information about studying at the University," Ms Fardell said.

"From applying, pathways and costs, to scholarships, accommodation and support, these events help parents help their child prepare for university."

In addition, the NSW University Admission Centre will also attend the Albury event to explain the ATAR score that their child receives after the Higher School Certificate exams, how it is calculated, and the university preference system.

The free CSU Parents Information Evening will run from 5.30pm to 7.30pm in the Stanley A Room in the Commercial Club Albury, Dean Street, Albury. Please register to attend here.

Media Contact: Wes Ward, 0417 125 795

Media Note:
For interviews with Ms Katy Fardell, contact CSU Media.

Supporting educational aspirations of people with disability

Friday 8 Sep 2017

People living with disability are looking to higher education as a path to engaging with meaningful activity in their community, particularly in regional areas. But can our regional universities support these aspirations?

Researchers from five universities including Charles Sturt University (CSU) are currently investigating the experiences of people with disability who aspire to complete a university course in regional Australia.

The research team is now calling for people with disability in regional areas from Wangaratta in Victoria to Port Macquarie in NSW to share their experiences of higher education, particularly those:

  • currently at high school in Years 10 and 11 and who are interested to go to university; and,
  • mature aged people who  haven't been to university but are interested in study.

Clare Wilding"We want to interview volunteers from regional communities to understand their perceptions of higher education. We are investigating the barriers for people with disability in undertaking a university course," said CSU researcher Dr Clare Wilding.

"The uptake of higher education by people with disability is lower in regional areas than for their city counterparts," Dr Wilding said.

"According to the Australian Bureau of Statistics, people with disability are more likely to have lower levels of educational attainment. Furthermore, data from the bureau showed that there are more people aged 15 to 64 years living with disability in regional areas – around 18 per cent - than those living in major cities, which is 13 per cent. So we should see a higher proportion of students with disability from regional areas attending university."

"However, only two per cent of people with disability living in Australia's regional or remote areas are currently studying in higher education, compared with four per cent in a major city.

"We want to find out why this pattern is happening, and how universities, governments and the community can address the problem," she said.

As part of the project, the researchers have already surveyed and interviewed students with disability who are currently enrolled in regional universities.

"Through this research, we hope to improve access and participation in higher education by regional people with disability, particularly those from a low socio-economic background," Dr Wilding said.

The upcoming round of interviews will be conducted using media to suit the volunteer participants: by telephone, instant messaging, Skype, email or face-to-face. People wishing to participate should contact Ms Kate Freire on (02) 6051 9355 or email kfreire@csu.edu.au.

The researchers aim to complete and analyse the interviews before the end of 2017, and report final recommendations to the Federal Department of Education by the middle of 2018.

Media Contact: Wes Ward, 0417 125 795

Media Note:

Interviews with project researcher Dr Clare Wilding are available through CSU Media.

The research project, titled "Understanding how regionality and socioeconomic status intersect with disability", is funded by the Federal Department of Education.

The project has been approved by the CSU Human Ethics Committee, project number H17124.

Other partners in the project are Federation University in Victoria, and University of Southern Queensland, Central Queensland University and James Cook University in Queensland.

Hope, recovery, resilience for beyondblue speaker in Albury

Friday 18 Aug 2017

Ms Rebecca Moore has seen her share of mental illness.

She will share her personal journey of hope, recovery and resilience in the face of depression and anxiety as part of the Explorations Series public lecture at Charles Sturt University (CSU) in Albury-Wodonga on Tuesday 22 August.

Ms Moore spent most of her career in the airline industry as a flight attendant and is a volunteer speaker for beyondblue, a national organisation that works to raise awareness about anxiety and depression, reduce the associated stigma, and encourage people to seek help.

She became a speaker because she wanted to 'pay it forward' by encouraging others to talk to their friends or doctor if they feel they may have symptoms of depression and anxiety.

In addition to speaking about her own experiences, she will also outline how the audience can seek help, or support a friend or family member who may find themselves in a difficult position.

Ms Moore's interests include running, yoga, reading, going to concerts and music festivals - she is a big fan of Kylie Minogue - and is currently completing study in nutritional medicine. Ms Moore is also a proud mother of two boys, aged three and five.

Ms Moore's free public lecture, titled 'Hope, recovery and resilience', will run from 7pm to 8pm on Tuesday 22 August in the CD Blake Auditorium (room 104), building 751 (car park 2), off Elizabeth Mitchell Drive, Thurgoona.

To attend this free public lecture, and for catering purposes as the lecture is followed by light refreshments, please register for this event.

Media Contact: Wes Ward, 0417 125 795

Media Note:

For more information, contact Regional Relations Assistant Ms Wendy Rose Davison via email alburywodonga@csu.edu.au or phone (02) 6051 9806.

North-East consultant to build leadership skills

Tuesday 11 Jul 2017

A marketing consultant to the agribusiness sectors in North-East Victoria aims to increase her skills to help expand opportunities in these industries through a leadership program starting this month at Charles Sturt University (CSU).

Ms Alison Lloyd aims to learn the leadership skills she needs to help the local food and wine industries take advantage of the growing opportunities offered through tourism in the region.

"I believe there is great potential offered by the emerging agri-tourism sector. Visitors from major Australian cities and overseas are enthralled by the environment and quality produce of our region, and they want more," Ms Lloyd said.

"I want to help local businesses create attractive experiences for these visitors, and tell their stories far and wide."

To obtain these advanced leadership skills, Ms Lloyd is taking part in the 12-month Regional Leadership Program Course being offered by CSU at the Wangaratta Regional Study Centre.

"I will need to draw on highly developed skills in communication, project management and stakeholder engagement," she said.

"It's not an easy thing to do, to bring together the interests and concerns of a wide group of people into a single vision - so I need every skill I can get, which I aim to get through this program."

The CSU Regional Leadership Program builds on the personal and skills development in the Alpine Valleys Community Leadership Program which Ms Lloyd recently completed.

Ms Lloyd currently works extensively with the regional 'Wines of the King Valley' marketing board and is a board member with the Beechworth Food Co-op.

Coordinator of the CSU Regional Leadership Program, Ms Ilena Young, noted that the program can also lead to the Master of Business Leadership, also offered through CSU.

"I am delighted to get this inaugural program off the ground in the region.  We have had interest from people in such varied sectors as health, environmental management, education and planning, all of them located in North-East Victoria," Ms Young said.

The first two-day module of the Regional Leadership Program commences at the Wangaratta Regional Study Centre, 218 Tone Road, Wangaratta, on Thursday 27 July.

Media Contact: Wes Ward, 0417 125 795

Media Note:
For interviews with Ms Alison Lloyd or Ms Ilena Young, contact CSU Media.

Robots get partnership grant from CSU

Monday 12 Jun 2017

Robot carA project to provide equipment to teach robotics in a Corowa school has been awarded $1 000 through the Charles Sturt University (CSU) Community-University Partnerships (CUP) program.

Principal at St Mary's Primary School in Corowa, Mr Glenn McMahon, said the grant will be used to purchase robots to enhance the coding education already practiced at the school.

"This is part of our push to encourage education in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) in our schools," Mr McMahon said.

"For example, in our school we want to develop a rural hub for digital technology and STEM education accessible to 40 schools within one hour drive of Corowa.

"We are so excited to have been the recipients of this grant. We can't wait to put it into action," Mr McMahon said.

In the latest round of grants, the University provided around $25,000 for community projects across all its campuses, from Albury-Wodonga to Port Macquarie.

Head of Campus at CSU in Albury-Wodonga, Dr Jenni Munday, said "the CUP program supports the development of our regions through contributions to cultural, economic, sporting and related activities.

"It also builds aspirations and awareness of higher education particularly among young people living in rural and regional communities.

"This year saw a number of CUP grants awarded to projects involving STEM education in regional schools.

Media Contact: Wes Ward, 0417 125 795

Media Note:

For interviews with St Mary's school principal, Mr Glenn McMahon, call CSU Media.

More information on the CUP grants is here.

Viewing page 1 of 1: Previous | 1 | Next

Back to web page (non print view)