Albury-Wodonga

Viewing page 1 of 115: Previous | 1 2 3 4 5 | Next

Understanding hamstring and groin injuries

Tuesday 21 Mar 2017

BasketballA Charles Sturt University (CSU) researcher is part of a team investigating hamstring and groin injuries in basketball, to improve injury prevention and rehabilitation strategies.

Mr Luke Donnan from CSU's School of Community Health in Albury-Wodonga, is part of the team led by the University of Newcastle, in collaboration with the Australian Institute of Sport, Basketball Australia's Centre of Excellence, and La Trobe University.

The researchers will study top male Australian basketball players over three years to determine the different mechanical factors involved in hamstring and adductor, or groin, muscle injuries.

"Even with the significant advances in sports medicine over the past 20 years, hamstring and groin injury rates haven't changed a great deal in that time," Mr Donnan said.

"This study aims to increase our understanding of why these injuries are occurring, both the immediate causes but also the factors that may contribute to future injuries of those muscle groups.

"My research has focused on hamstring injuries in Australian Rules football players and in this study we will be performing very similar research on the same body part, just with a different sporting group.

"The results from this study will allow for a number of direct comparisons across the two different sporting codes."

The study received over $390 000 in funding from a strategic partnership between the National Basketball Association (NBA) and General Electric (GE) Healthcare that aims to address injuries affecting NBA players and everyday athletes.

Media Contact: Wes Ward, 0417 125 795

Media Note:

Contact CSU Media to arrange interviews with Mr Luke Donnan at CSU in Albury-Wodonga, Ellis Street, Thurgoona, on Wednesday 22 March.

The HAMI Study: Investigating Hamstring and Adductor Myotendinous Injury Risk Factors in Basketball is a collaboration between UON, AIS, Basketball Australia's Centre of Excellence, La Trobe University and Charles Sturt University.

CSU students get carbon foot in campus door

Wednesday 8 Mar 2017

CSU Green O WeekStudents at Charles Sturt University (CSU) are aiming to change their behaviours to significantly reduce their carbon use in 2017.

During the recent Orientation Week, nearly 300 students at CSU in Albury-Wodonga, Wagga Wagga, Dubbo, Orange, Bathurst and Port Macquarie signed a pledge to reduce their personal carbon footprint.

CSU Green Manager, Mr Ed Maher, said that the students' behaviour changes would also contribute towards the University's carbon neutrality status.

"Charles Sturt University is currently the only University in Australia that has been certified as carbon neutral by the federal government. This means that we have done a lot of work to reduce our emissions and the remaining amount of greenhouse gases we emit into the atmosphere are equal to the amount that we offset through certified offset projects associated with reforestation in central NSW and a range of internationally-based renewable energy systems," Mr Maher said.

"The student pledges, which are a new Orientation activity, also make students aware of what it takes to be carbon neutral. The students embraced the initiative with absolute enthusiasm. This reminds us that our strong leadership in this area is important to these future leaders and professionals in the making."

Student pledges included actions aimed at reducing waste and improving energy efficiency as well as in conserving water.

Mr Maher said popular pledges included 'I'm committed to turning off my computer at the power point when not in use, using reusable bags and saying no to plastic and packaging, and get my coffee in a Keep Cup because I know disposable cups are rubbish and are not recyclable'.

"Charles Sturt University is supporting the students' pledges by employing four student Sustainability Advisers who live on campus and will lead sustainability initiatives with students and help them fulfil their pledges," he said.

The advisers will live on CSU in Albury-Wodonga, Bathurst, Orange and Wagga Wagga.

Media Contact: Wes Ward, 0417 125 795

Media Note:

For interviews with CSU Green Manager Mr Ed Maher in Wagga Wagga contact CSU Media.

Images of student pledgers during Orientation can be found on the CSU Green Facebook page.

2017 CSU CUP grants available for Bathurst region

Monday 27 Feb 2017

Charles Sturt University (CSU) is calling for applications for its Community-University Partnership (CUP) grants for 2017 in two categories which are available from Monday 27 February.

CSU Vice-Chancellor Professor Andrew Vann highlighted the CUP grants in a video address.

Head of Campus at CSU in Bathurst, Associate Professor Chika Anyanwu, said, "The CUP grants are a practical expression of the University's support for and contribution to a range of organisations that enrich our regional communities.

"The goal of the program is to support the development of our regions through contributions to cultural, economic, sporting and related activities and build higher education aspiration and awareness particularly among young people in rural and regional communities.

"I encourage all relevant and interested groups to consider applying and submit an application."

The 2017 CUP grant categories available from Monday 27 February are CUP Head of Campus Small Grants Program, and CUP Rural and Regional Arts and Culture Program. Subsequently, the CUP Rural and Regional Education Development Program opens on Monday 3 April; the CUP Rural and Regional Indigenous Community Engagement Program opens on Monday 1 May; and the CUP Rural and Regional Sports Development Program has two opening dates – 'Summer' on Monday 1 May, and 'Winter' on 4 September.

Media Contact: Bruce Andrews, (02) 6338 6084

Media Note:
Contact CSU Media to arrange interviews with Head of Campus at CSU in Bathurst, Associate Professor Chika Anyanwu.

Celebrate and relax during O Week in Albury-Wodonga

Friday 17 Feb 2017

Charles Sturt University (CSU) in Albury-Wodonga will welcome more than new 400 students next week with a range of academic and social activities to help them settle into life at CSU.

Orientation Week will kick off from Monday 20 February with some courses providing a 'laid back' start for new students. These include Olympic-style activities between 11am and 1pm for new students in the School of Environmental Sciences at the Albury Wodonga Yacht Club, off Old Weir Road, near Kangaroo Point on Lake Hume.

Tuesday, 21 February is a big day in Albury-Wodonga, starting with pomp and circumstance, complete with a procession of staff in academic gowns, during two official Commencement Ceremonies in the University's CD Blake Theatre, starting at 10am and 11am.

During and after the Commencement Ceremonies, a colourful Market Day runs from 10.30am to 2pm on Tuesday 21 February, under the gum trees near the Teaching and Learning Hub.

Other O Week highlights include academic sessions, library and laboratory tours, along with social events such as BBQs, quizzes and live music. 

This year, O Week student leaders will stand out as they are dressed in pink to help raise awareness of and money for the McGrath Foundation.

Students will move into their accommodation at CSU in Albury-Wodonga from 12.30pm on Saturday 18 February.

Classes for all new and continuing students start on campus from Monday 27 February.

Across the University more than 8 700 students will begin studying at CSU in 2017, 2 800 of those on-campus and nearly 6 000 through CSU online.

Media Contact: Wes Ward, 0417 125 795

Media Note:

Contact CSU Media to arrange interviews during the week.

Most O Week daytime activity will be in the Learning and Teaching Hub and Gums Café, off Elizabeth Mitchell Drive, CSU in Thurgoona. Call CSU Media to receive guidance to O Week events.

The full O Week program can be viewed here.

Launch of funding program in Albury for 2017

Friday 10 Feb 2017

Dr Jenny Munday

Charles Sturt University (CSU) in Albury-Wodonga will launch its Community University Partnerships (CUP) program on Monday 13 February with thousands of dollars available to support local organisations and groups.

On Monday 13 February, CSU Vice-Chancellor Professor Andrew Vann will launch the 2017 program via video link, which this year will particularly target Indigenous, educational, arts and sporting groups.

Head of CSU in Albury-Wodonga, Dr Jenni Munday, said the CUP grant program, which commenced in 2014, forms an integral part of the University's ongoing commitment to make a positive contribution to its communities.

"This year's CUP program will support the development of regional NSW through direct grants from Charles Sturt University totalling $100 000 to local community groups."

In 2016, CSU provided 103 CUP grants across all its regions.

"We want the young people in our regional communities to aspire as much to higher education as their metropolitan cousins, and this is one way to raise their awareness of what is available on their doorsteps," Dr Munday said.CUP funding applications for the Arts opens on Monday 27 February.

Further information about CUP is available here.

Media Contact: Wes Ward, 0417 125 795

Media Note:
Interviews on CSU's Community University Partnerships (CUP) program will be available from the Head of CSU in Albury-Wodonga, Dr Jenni Munday, at 10.30am on Monday 13 February in front of building 763 (Education Building), Off Elizabeth Mitchell Drive, Thurgoona.

Getting the buzz on pollinating insects in Albury

Monday 30 Jan 2017

Charles Sturt University (CSU) scientists will be paying particular attention to birds and pollinating insects in Albury streets over the next few months.

Honey bees aren't the only pollinatorsThe researchers will be conducting a survey of the native birds and insects that pollinate gardens to investigate the impact of urbanisation.

Ecologist from CSU's School of Environmental Sciences, Dr Dale Nimmo said, "As Albury is expanding and its population is increasing, it's important to understand how this impacts biodiversity, including those species that occur in the heart of the city."

The project, which will have CSU researchers walking Albury's streets in search of native birds and pollinators, is part of a wider study looking at the best way to grow regional cities while minimising the impact on biodiversity.

"To help protect biodiversity in cities as they expand, there are two options. 'Land sharing' happens when people are spread thinly in low-density 'leafy' suburbs, which allow species to occur within urban areas" Dr Nimmo said.

"On the other hand, 'Land sparing' dedicates some areas for high density housing and other parts for large-scale biodiversity conservation, such as nature reserves".

"We want to see if the best way to conserve our biodiversity is land sharing, land sparing or a combination of both."

The project will look at birds and pollinator insects as these two groups of animals can respond differently to urban environments.

Ecologist from CSU's Institute for Land Water and Society, Dr Manu Saunders said, "There've been very few studies done on pollinator insects in Australia's urban areas. But urban gardens can actually be great habitats for native bees and other pollinator insects, provided they have lots of different flowers and low pesticide use." 

The research has been funded by a CSU Sustainability Research Seed Grant, through CSU Green and the WH Gladstones Population and Environment Fund.

The bird and pollinator surveys will run from January until mid-2017

Media Contact: Ms Emily Malone and Ms Fiona Halloran, (02) 6933 2207

Media Note:
Contact CSU Media to arrange interviews with Dr Dale Nimmo from CSU in Albury-Wodonga. He is due to go overseas from Saturday 4 February.

Students celebrated at CSU Albury-Wodonga graduations

Monday 12 Dec 2016

Mortar boards and academic gowns will be a feature of Albury's streets this week as Charles Sturt University (CSU) celebrates the graduation of more than 400 students.

Graduation at CSU More than 1 300 family and friends will join the graduates in the Albury Entertainment Centre for three ceremonies on Tuesday 13 December and Wednesday 14 December.

Highlights include:

12:30pm, Tuesday 13 December

Approximately 140 graduates and more than 425 guests are due to attend this ceremony.

Graduates are from the Faculty of Arts and Education and the Faculty of Business, Justice and Behavioural Studies.

The Occasional Address will be delivered by Head of CSU's School of Management and Marketing Associate Professor Mark Frost.

5pm, Tuesday 13 December

Approximately 150 graduates and more than 487 guests are due to attend this ceremony.

Graduates are from the Faculty of Arts and Education and the Faculty of Science. 

 - The University Council will confer the title of Emeritus Professor on Bob Perry, an internationally recognised and passionate educator in the field of early childhood numeracy, educational transitions and Indigenous education. Professor Perry is being recognised for his distinguished services across the areas of teaching, research and administration at CSU. Professor Perry will also deliver the Occasional Address.  Four of Professor Perry's doctoral students will also graduate in the same ceremony.

 - Dr Lysa Dealtry will be awarded her PhD titled, Narratives of starting school: Learning from Aboriginal children, their mothers and their educators. Her research involved interviews with Aboriginal children, their mothers and their educators in the Gudaga Goes to School project. The study explored the ways in which children's and mothers' sense of self - ways of being, knowing and doing - contributes to a positive start to school.

The ceremony will see PhDs awarded to six graduates from the Institute of Land Water and Society (ILWS) including:

 - CSU Media and Communications Officer Dr Wes Ward has combined his passion for communication and science in his PhD, Exploring in-person and technologically-mediated communication within international agricultural research teams.In his research Dr Ward interviewed 30 researchers in Australia and Lao PRD to examine the barriers and opportunities for communicating agricultural research conducted in partnership with developing countries, especially using computer communications.

 - To make sure her family in Mexico can see her receive a PhD, Dr Luisa Perez-Mujica is planning to live-stream the ceremony. Dr Perez-Mujica's PhD, Development of a sustainability assessment tool in context of social-ecological systems using system simulation and participatory modelling: The case of the Winton Wetlands, Victoria, Australia, studied people's opinions of the rehabilitation of the wetlands in order to develop a new socio-ecological approach to assess sustainability. Read more on CSU News here.

 - Originally from Zimbabwe, Dr Chaka Chirozva and his family are currently based in South Australia. Dr Chirozva's PhD, Community Engagement in the Governance of Transfrontier Conservation Areas: An Analysis of the Implementation of Sengwe Tshipise Wilderness Corridor, Zimbabwe, has made an important contribution to the understanding of community engagement in transfrontier conservation areas.

 - Bachelor of Science (honours) graduate Ms Bettina Grieve spent two months in Laos PRD for her research examining the effectiveness of microchips to track fish migration in the Mekong River. This international research experience has seen Ms Grieve awarded a place in Sydney Water's graduate program.

9.30am, Wednesday 14 December

125 graduates and more than 400 guests are due to attend this ceremony.

The Occasional Address will be delivered by CSU Dean of Students, Professor Julia Coyle.

Graduates are from the Faculty of Science.

- Bachelor of Health Science (Speech Pathology) graduate Ms Ashley Barclay will be awarded the University Medal, the highest honour conferred on an undergraduate student. Ms Barclay took part in an international work placement in Vietnam earlier this year as part of a CSU Global program

 - Olympic Gold Medallist and member of the Australian Women's Rugby 7's team Ms Alicia Quirk will be awarded a Bachelor of Physiotherapy. With the support and flexible study options provided through CSU's elite athlete program, Ms Quirk has completed her studies in between the training, travel and competition demands of being a professional athlete.

 - Lecturer in podiatry from CSU's School of Community Health Dr Kristy Robson will be awarded her PhD Exploration of Fall Risk in Regional Australia. Dr Robson's research into the factors that influence the risk of an older person falling has led to development of a model of careinvolving a range of stakeholders to support older people to maintain safe independence as they age. 

 - Three Bachelor of Podiatry graduates, Mr Tim Pargeter, Ms Rylee Belsher, and Ms Sophie Robertson have shared the educational journey from Kindergarten to Graduation, attending the same schools and then studying the same degree.

Media Contact: Ms Fiona Halloran and Ms Emily Malone, 0439 475 315

Media Note:

The three CSU graduation ceremonies will be held on Tuesday 13 and Wednesday 14 December in the Albury Entertainment Centre, 525 Swift Street in Albury.

Contact Ms Fiona Halloran on 0439 475 315 from CSU Media for further information.

New Head of Campus for CSU in Albury-Wodonga

Thursday 8 Dec 2016

A new Head of Campus has been appointed at Charles Sturt University (CSU) in Albury-Wodonga.

Dr Jennifer Munday (pictured) is the new Head of Campus at CSU in Albury-Wodonga until the end of November 2017.

Director of the CSU Office of Government and Community Relations, Mr Peter Fraser said: "I congratulate Dr Munday on her appointment and look forward to working with her on advancing Charles Sturt University's community engagement program in the Albury-Wodonga region."

Dr Munday is currently a Senior Lecturer and the Associate Head of the School of Education .

"Having been employed at Charles Sturt University for more than 20 years, Dr Munday brings significant experience and commitment to the role of developing and fostering its connections with the community of Albury-Wodonga," Mr Fraser said.

Dr Munday said it was a privilege to be appointed to the role of Head of Campus.

"As a University with the goal to build regional capacity, I want to promote the values embedded in the principle of Yindyamarra Winhanganha or the wisdom of respectfully knowing how to live well in a world worth living in," Dr Munday said.

"This is the philosophy at the heart of University's approach to education, and I am committed to providing higher education to Albury-Wodonga and surrounding areas which I have done for many years."

Mr Fraser also acknowledged and thanked the former Head of Campus Ms Julie Clearly for her extensive efforts and leadership in progressing the University's engagement and community relations program.

Media Contact: Jo Mazzocchi and Fiona Halloran, (02) 6933 2207

Media Note:

Head of the Albury-Wodonga campus, Dr Jennifer Munday is available for interview. Please contact CSU Media.

The CSU Heads of Campus are:

- Albury-Wodonga: Dr Jennifer Munday, Associate Head of the School of Education

- Bathurst: Associate Professor Chika Anyanwu, Head of the School of Communication & Creative Industries

- Dubbo: Ms Catherine Maginnis, Lecturer in the School of Nursing, Midwifery and Indigenous Health

- Orange: Dr Heather Robinson, Associate Head of the School of Biomedical Sciences

- Port Macquarie: Professor Heather Cavanagh, Pro-Vice Chancellor of the Office of International Education and Partnerships

- Wagga Wagga: Ms Miriam Dayhew, University Ombudsman.

Film to raise awareness about off-shore detention

Thursday 1 Dec 2016

A screening of the film, Chasing Asylum at Charles Sturt University (CSU) in Albury-Wodonga aims to stimulate discussion about Australia's off-shore detention policies and the role that regional communities can play in refugee resettlement.

The free event on Saturday 3 December is being hosted by CSU's Centre for Law and Justice.

Lecturer at the Centre, Ms Charlotte Steer said, "Charles Sturt University aims to produce law graduates who are committed to social justice and community service, particularly for Indigenous Australians, and for regional and remote Australia.

"The Albury-Wodonga region has a long tradition of supporting migrants and a good track record for successfully supporting refugees as part of resettlement programs.

"Chasing Asylum was made from footage smuggled out of the immigration detention centres on Manus Island and Nauru and shows the distressing conditions for the men, women and children who are compulsorily detained there.

"We hope this event will raise awareness of the broader issue and add to the conversation about how we can make a difference in our local community."

The film will be followed by a panel discussion with representatives from organisations working with migrants and refugees in the Border region.

For more information contact Ms Steer via email csteer@csu.edu.au

Media Contact: Emily Malone and Fiona Halloran , (02) 6933 2207

Media Note:

The screening of Chasing Asylum will be held from 4:30pm to 7pm at the CD Blake Auditorium, building 751, near car park 2 at CSU in Albury Wodonga, Elizabeth Mitchell Drive, Thurgoona.​

CSU lecturer Ms Charlotte Steer is available for interviews from 8.30am Friday 2 December. Contact CSU Media to arrange interviews.

Australian Museum’s Science on the Road at CSU

Monday 31 Oct 2016

More than 700 students from 14 Riverina region schools will take part in the Australian Museum's Science on the Road program at the Charles Sturt University (CSU) in Albury-Wodonga on Wednesday 2 and Thursday 3 November.

The primary and high school students will learn how to collect forensic evidence from a crime scene;  attempt to erupt a volcano; learn the basics of nursing such as hygiene and cardio pulmonary resuscitation; and develop their own computer game, animation or website.

Australian Museum's Manager Science Engagement and Events Ms Catherine Beehag said Science on the Road aims to bring science, in all its forms, to regional and rural NSW.

"Our goal is to make sure the students who attend are so engrossed in what they are doing and experiencing that they forget that they are actually learning about science. 

"We want the children who love science, of course, but we also want those students who think that science is boring and uncool. We aim to change that with our programs," she said.

Ms Beehag said one of the most popular events in the Science on the Road is the Starlab Planetarium, a giant inflatable dome that allows the students to immerse themselves in the exploration of a galaxy, while traveling through time and space.

Activities include: CSI World, Indigenous Science and Bushtucker, Spin Science, Nursing Needs You, Waterbug Watch, Worm Detectives, Volcanoes and Natural Disasters Show, Starlab Planetarium and Code Club.

The full program is available here.

Media Contact: Fiona Halloran and Emily Malone , (02) 6933 2207

Media Note:

Primary school students will attend Science on the Road at CSU in Albury-Wodonga on Wednesday 2 November and high school students on Thursday 3 November.

For media queries contact Australian Museum Manager Science Engagement and Events Ms Catherine Beehag mobile 0407 062 779.

Photo courtesy of Australian Museum. The life-sized Muttaburrasaurus puppet Winny will stroll around CSU in Albury-Wodonga as part of Science on the Road.

Viewing page 1 of 115: Previous | 1 2 3 4 5 | Next