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Indigenous community leaders recognised as leading educators

Thursday 5 Oct 2017

Charles Sturt University (CSU) has recognised the contributions of the Indigenous and wider community in Bathurst to its law, justice and policing degrees during a ceremony in September.

During a presentation to staff, community members, and Indigenous Elders, the Head of the Australian Graduate School of Policing and Security and the Centre for Law and Justice, Associate Professor Nick O'Brien, presented awards for excellence in teaching, research, leadership, community engagement, and impact at CSU in Bathurst.

Brian GrantRepresenting local Elders, Uncle Brian Grant (pictured left) and also known as 'Maliyan' (Eagle) in Wiradjuri, accepted the awards from Professor O'Brien.

"I've been with this program for two years," Uncle Brian said.

"It's an opportunity to work with Charles Sturt University students who are going to work for NSW Police and NSW Department of Community Services (DOCS).

"We give them an Aboriginal community perspective, while we can also let them know about how we function as a community.

"I have worked for the police force and for DOCS, so I have a good background. I think students like to get that insider information, that bit of foresight of what they are going to encounter later in their careers.

"Both the students and we Elders benefit through our community involvement, so from our point of view, we want to continue the program."

The Bathurst Wiradjuri Elders received their Teaching Excellence Award for their leadership and delivery of content to courses in the University's Centre for Law and Justice in Bathurst.

Centre Director, Associate Professor Alison Gerard, regards the awards as a practical demonstration of the University's commitment to forging links with the local community and in recognising the teaching expertise of Indigenous Elders.

"We wanted our students to learn from the Aboriginal Elders in our community, to provide them with the experience needed to work effectively within communities in their chosen professions," Professor Gerard said.

"Hearing directly from the Elders helps students understand the richness and resilience of Indigenous knowledge. This can only strengthen the Charles Sturt University law and criminal justice degrees."

Media Contact: Bruce Andrews, 0418 669 362

Media Note:
For interviews with Associate Professor Alison Gerard, contact CSU Media.

Trauma trial for paramedic students at CSU

Wednesday 27 Sep 2017

Paramedicine students at Charles Sturt University (CSU) will have the opportunity to demonstrate their skills in assessing and managing trauma patients during a practical exercise involving the State Emergency Service (SES) in Bathurst on Friday 29 September.

The exercise, which runs from 11am to 1pm outside building 1455 on Ordnance Road, involves extricating several patients from a car following a simulated road traffic accident.

"This extrication exercise forms part of the simulated learning activities for first year paramedic students in fundamental subject in clinical practice," said CSU lecturer Ms Clare Sutton.

"This exercise provides an invaluable opportunity for the students to experience working alongside other emergency service operators as part of an interagency team."

During the exercise, the students have to identify potential hazards on scene before assessing each of the casualties to determine which patients are a priority and then formulate an extraction plan based on those priorities.

This information is conveyed to the SES Rescue team who will use various rescue techniques to extricate each of the patients according to individual clinical needs as identified by the student paramedics.

 "The exercise will give the students the opportunity to practice their skills of assessment and management when presented with multi-trauma casualties," Ms Sutton said.

"These will be vitally important skills for the students to master in preparation for their future role as a front line paramedic given the requirement to work collaboratively with colleagues from other emergency services in order to achieve the best outcome for the patient.

"We are very fortunate, in the paramedic team to have such a close working relationship with the local SES unit as this provides many fantastic opportunities for our students to experience working as part of an interagency team in high fidelity simulations.

"It's always a very popular day with the students as they all get a chance to experience some of the challenges involved with these type of incidents from both the paramedics' and patients' perspectives."

The Bachelor of Paramedicine is available through the School of Biomedical Sciences at CSU in Bathurst and Port Macquarie and CSU online.

Media Contact: Wes Ward, 0417 125 795

Media Note:

The exercise involving CSU paramedicine students and members of the SES will be held at the canopy area, outside building 1455 on Ordnance Road, Bathurst.

The media is invited to attend to event. Lecturer Ms Clare Sutton will be available for interview. Contact CSU Media.

Supporting educational aspirations of people with disability

Friday 8 Sep 2017

People living with disability are looking to higher education as a path to engaging with meaningful activity in their community, particularly in regional areas. But can our regional universities support these aspirations?

Researchers from five universities including Charles Sturt University (CSU) are currently investigating the experiences of people with disability who aspire to complete a university course in regional Australia.

The research team is now calling for people with disability in regional areas from Wangaratta in Victoria to Port Macquarie in NSW to share their experiences of higher education, particularly those:

  • currently at high school in Years 10 and 11 and who are interested to go to university; and,
  • mature aged people who  haven't been to university but are interested in study.

Clare Wilding"We want to interview volunteers from regional communities to understand their perceptions of higher education. We are investigating the barriers for people with disability in undertaking a university course," said CSU researcher Dr Clare Wilding.

"The uptake of higher education by people with disability is lower in regional areas than for their city counterparts," Dr Wilding said.

"According to the Australian Bureau of Statistics, people with disability are more likely to have lower levels of educational attainment. Furthermore, data from the bureau showed that there are more people aged 15 to 64 years living with disability in regional areas – around 18 per cent - than those living in major cities, which is 13 per cent. So we should see a higher proportion of students with disability from regional areas attending university."

"However, only two per cent of people with disability living in Australia's regional or remote areas are currently studying in higher education, compared with four per cent in a major city.

"We want to find out why this pattern is happening, and how universities, governments and the community can address the problem," she said.

As part of the project, the researchers have already surveyed and interviewed students with disability who are currently enrolled in regional universities.

"Through this research, we hope to improve access and participation in higher education by regional people with disability, particularly those from a low socio-economic background," Dr Wilding said.

The upcoming round of interviews will be conducted using media to suit the volunteer participants: by telephone, instant messaging, Skype, email or face-to-face. People wishing to participate should contact Ms Kate Freire on (02) 6051 9355 or email kfreire@csu.edu.au.

The researchers aim to complete and analyse the interviews before the end of 2017, and report final recommendations to the Federal Department of Education by the middle of 2018.

Media Contact: Wes Ward, 0417 125 795

Media Note:

Interviews with project researcher Dr Clare Wilding are available through CSU Media.

The research project, titled "Understanding how regionality and socioeconomic status intersect with disability", is funded by the Federal Department of Education.

The project has been approved by the CSU Human Ethics Committee, project number H17124.

Other partners in the project are Federation University in Victoria, and University of Southern Queensland, Central Queensland University and James Cook University in Queensland.

Indigenous business program starts in Dubbo

Friday 25 Aug 2017

Walan Mayinygu logoStrengthening Indigenous entrepreneurship and business know-how is the aim of the one-week program to be run from next Monday 28 August in Dubbo by Charles Sturt University (CSU).

The Walan Mayinygu Indigenous Entrepreneurship Pop Up Hub project aims to strengthen Indigenous entrepreneurship in regional communities across NSW.

The Dubbo hub is the first of four one-week programs to run in coming months.

The program was developed by Associate Professor Michelle Evans to engage with and inspire Indigenous business people, as well as those thinking about going into business, by offering workshops, masterclasses, trade shows, networking events and opportunities for participants to pitch their business ideas.

Michelle Evans 250x150Professor Evans invites all Dubbo based businesses, and government agencies and non-government organisations wishing to work with Indigenous businesses, to various networking lunches and masterclasses being held between 1pm to 2pm from Monday 28 August to Thursday 1 September. Register here to attend these sessions.

The first hub will be officially launched on Monday 28 August at the Dubbo Regional Theatre and Convention Centre.

"We have twelve Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander entrepreneurs teaching and presenting at the Walan Mayingu Dubbo program alongside professors from Charles Sturt University and executive educators," Professor Evans said.

For further information and to register participation in the Walan Mayinygu Indigenous Entrepreneurship Pop Up Hub, go to this site or the Walan Mayinygu Facebook site.

Media Contact: Wes Ward, 0417 125 795

Media Note:

For interviews with Associate Professor Michelle Evans, contact CSU Media.

The Power is with young women

Monday 7 Aug 2017

Charles Sturt University (CSU) in Bathurst will host its annual major event highlighting the Power of Engineering for young women interested in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) as a future career.

Located in the award-winning Engineering building and run by CSU Engineering, The Power of Engineering will welcome 250 female students from Years 8 to 10 in high schools across the NSW central west region this Thursday 10 and Friday 11 August.

Andrea GoncherLecturer in engineering, Dr Andrea Goncher, said the participants will see the opportunities that a career in engineering or science can offer over the two-day program.

"Last year's event was a runaway success, and we are looking forward to inspiring the next generation of women engineers for our region, Australia and the world," Dr Goncher said.

The CSU engineering course has already been recognised globally, with one of its student teams winning the national Engineers Without Borders Challenge in 2016.

In addition, CSU Engineering was also chosen this year by the renowned US-based Massachusetts Institute of Technology as the only Australian case study for a project highlighting the four most innovative courses in the world.

The day-long program will provide real-world science and engineering problems for the students to solve while demonstrating the importance of collaborative work and human-centred design.

"One of the challenges of recruiting young women into engineering is helping them to see themselves as engineers," Dr Goncher said.

"By giving them real-world challenges to solve, and female engineer role models to guide them while they do so, we help these young women see that there is a future for them in a STEM career."

The students are travelling from public and private high schools located in Blayney, Gilgandra, Mudgee, Orange and Oberon as well as Bathurst to take part in the program.

Media Contact: Bruce Andrews, 02 6338 6084

Media Note:

The Power of Engineering event will be held in the Engineering building (building 1305, near car park P7) at CSU in Bathurst from 9am on Thursday 10 to 2.30pm on Friday 11 August.

Dr Andrea Goncher will be available for interviews and pictures at 12.30pm on Thursday 10 August at the Engineering building.

CSU CUP arts and education grants for Orange region

Tuesday 4 Jul 2017

CSU gateway Orange angledOrganisations in the Orange region have been advised of the success of their applications for Charles Sturt University (CSU) Community-University Partnership (CUP) arts and education grants.

The grants announcements are for the Rural and Regional Education Development Program and the Rural and Regional Arts and Culture Program.

Head of Campus at CSU in Orange Dr Heather Robinson said, "The University's motto is 'For the public good', and the Community-University Partnerships program is just one of the ways that is demonstrated and gives expression to our ethos 'yindyamarra winhanganha', meaning 'the wisdom of respectfully knowing how to live well in a world worth living in'.

"The CUP grants aim to advance our mission by cultivating strong, relevant and collaborative partnerships with local communities, industry, government and employers.

"I congratulate the successful applicants in our region and wish them success with their projects."

The CUP Rural and Regional Education Development Program is a small grant program (generally between $500 and $1 000) to assist primary and secondary schools, and not-for-profit early childhood centres in the University's regions to acquire equipment or consumables that assist students' learning and engagement in rural and regional areas. Successful applicants include:

Canobolas Public School, Robotics Challenge Enhancement ($1 000)

Under the banner of STEM education the aims of the continuing Robotics programs at Canobolas Public School are to provide the opportunities for Stage 3 students to develop and demonstrate confidence in making reasoned evidenced-based decisions.

Forbes High School, 21st Century Technologies ($1 000)

The purchase of SPHERO robots for use in curriculum delivery across three Key Learning Areas.

Parkes High School, Dash and Dot Maker Space ($1 000)

Purchase of two 'Dash and Dot Wonder Packs' for students to use in the new Maker Space in the library, to enable an engaging hands-on introduction to robotics, coding and problem-solving.

Parkes East Public School, Effective Transition to School ($750)

Equipment and resources to support a new program for parents and incoming students in transition to Kindergarten, with sessions for students, parents and both involving activities and workshops.

The CUP Rural and Regional Arts and Culture Program is a small grants program (generally $500 to $1 000) to support regional arts and culture programs including artists-in-residence, art shows, musical education, talks and lectures, and related activities that encourage engagement by younger people in artistic endeavours. Four successful applicants each received $1 000:

Rotary Club of Orange Inc., Creative poetry workshops in schools

The aim is to engage a professional poet to work with school students in Orange to teach them the skills to write poetry and to then present their poems at the 2018 Banjo Patterson Festival.

Canowindra Arts Incorporated, Young Artist Development and Exhibition

The aim is to create an annual program to engage local Canowindra and regional youth in creative painting, drawing and other selected arts through talks, practical workshops and exhibitions conducted by advanced, highly-talented regional artists.

Cudal Public School Parents and Citizens Association, Community Production

To help fund the Cudal Public School's biennial theatrical performance involving all students in the school. The performance allows students to showcase their acting, dancing and singing abilities.

Canowindra Public School Artists-in-ResidenceThis is a school-based community project which started in October 2016 with no funding by two local artists who currently work with a mixed-age group of children. The aim is to inspire children and teachers by providing a variety of ideas, techniques, and materials to develop enquiry and experimentation through process, and will also encourage other artists to be involved in the mentoring process.

Media Contact: Bruce Andrews, (02) 6338 6084

Media Note:

Contact CSU Media to arrange interviews.

CSU CUP grants announced for Orange region

Monday 26 Jun 2017

CSU gateway Orange angledOrganisations in the Orange region have learned of their successful applications for Charles Sturt University (CSU) Community-University Partnership (CUP) grants.

The grants announcements are for the Rural and Regional Education Development Program and the Rural and Regional Arts and Culture Program.

Head of Campus at CSU in Orange Dr Heather Robinson said, "The University's motto is 'For the public good', and the Community-University Partnerships program is just one of the ways that is demonstrated and gives expression to our ethos 'yindyamarra winhanganha', meaning 'the wisdom of respectfully knowing how to live well in a world worth living in'.

"The CUP grants aim to advance our mission by cultivating strong, relevant and collaborative partnerships with local communities, industry, government and employers.

"I congratulate the successful applicants in our region and wish them success with their projects."

The CUP Rural and Regional Education Development Program is a small grant program of between $500 and $1 000 to assist primary and secondary schools, and not-for-profit early childhood centres in the University's regions, to acquire equipment or consumables that assist students' learning and engagement in rural and regional areas. Successful applicants in include:

Canobolas Public School, Robotics Challenge Enhancement ($1 000)

Under the banner of STEM education, the aims of the continuing Robotics programs at Canobolas Public School are to provide the opportunities for Stage 3 students to develop and demonstrate confident decisions based on evidence.

Forbes High School, 21st Century Technologies ($1 000)

The purchase of SPHERO robots for use in curriculum delivery across three Key Learning Areas.

Parkes High School, Dash and Dot Maker Space ($1 000)

Purchase of two 'Dash and Dot Wonder Packs' for students to use in the new Maker Space in the library, to enable an engaging hands-on introduction to robotics, coding and problem-solving.

Parkes East Public School, Effective Transition to School ($750)

Equipment and resources to support a new program for parents and incoming students in transition to Kindergarten, with activities and workshops for students and parents.

The CUP Rural and Regional Arts and Culture Program is a small grants program between $500 and $1 000 to support regional arts and culture programs including artists-in-residence, art shows, musical education, talks and lectures, and related activities that encourage engagement by younger people in artistic endeavours. Four successful applicants each received $1 000 in the current round:

Rotary Club of Orange Inc., Creative poetry workshops in schools

The aim is to engage a professional poet to work with school students in Orange to teach them the skills to write poetry and to then present their poems at the 2018 Banjo Patterson Festival.

Canowindra Arts Incorporated, Young Artist Development and Exhibition

The aim is to create an annual program to engage local Canowindra and regional youth in creative painting, drawing and other selected arts through talks, practical workshops and exhibitions conducted by advanced, highly-talented regional artists.

Cudal Public School Parents and Citizens Association, Community Production

To help fund the Cudal Public School's biennial theatrical performance involving all students in the school. The performance allows students to showcase their acting, dancing and singing abilities.

Canowindra Public School Artists-in-Residence

This is a school-based community project which started in October 2016 with no funding by two local artists who currently work with children of mixed ages. The aim is to inspire children and teachers by providing a variety of ideas, techniques, and materials to develop enquiry and experimentation through process, and will also encourage other artists to be involved in the mentoring process.

Media Contact: Bruce Andrews, (02) 6338 6084

Media Note:
Contact CSU Media to arrange interviews.

Indigenous businesses program coming to Dubbo

Thursday 22 Jun 2017

Walan Mayinygu logoStrengthening Indigenous entrepreneurship and business know-how is the aim of a one-week Charles Sturt University (CSU) program to run in August in Dubbo.

Members of the Walan Mayinygu Indigenous Entrepreneurship Pop Up Hub project are visiting Dubbo on Monday 26 June to meet with the local organising committee and begin final preparations for a series of business innovation workshops to run from Monday 28 August to Friday 1 September.

Launched by Charles Sturt University (CSU) in partnership with the New South Wales Government and Indigenous Business Australia, the Walan Mayinygu Pop Up Hub project aims to strengthen Indigenous entrepreneurship in regional communities across NSW.

The program was developed by Associate Professor Michelle Evans to engage with and inspire Indigenous business people, as well as those thinking about going into business, by offering workshops, masterclasses, trade shows, networking events and opportunities for participants to pitch their business ideas.

Michelle Evans 250x150"We're excited to be in Dubbo on Monday meeting with a range of local stakeholders including Aboriginal business people," said Professor Evans, who is with CSU's Faculty of Business, Justice and Behavioural Sciences.

"We have twelve Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander entrepreneurs teaching and presenting at the Walan Mayingu Dubbo program alongside professors from Charles Sturt University and executive educators from Melbourne Business School and the University of NSW."

In August, the Dubbo Pop Up Hub will begin with an official opening at the Dubbo Regional Theatre and Convention Centre, followed by a networking lunch and masterclass presented by a selection of successful Indigenous entrepreneurs.

Other activities to occur during the week include networking lunches as well as workshops for established businesses on legal issues, business management, and social media engagement.

Hour-long masterclasses held each day will focus on topics such as thinking as an entrepreneur, creating value financially and non-financially, and market orientation.

There is also a day-long Youth Innovation Program on Wednesday 30 August, while several keynote speaker will also address participants during the week.  

"The Pop Up Hub will provide local people with a sense of what's available in term of business support. For some, it will pave the way for them to further develop their entrepreneurial interests and talents," said Mr Paul Schenk, Business Development Manager for the Western Office of Regional Development, NSW Department of Premier and Cabinet.

"This is a great opportunity for local people, and I encourage them to get involved. Harnessing and developing the entrepreneurial energy and talents of the Indigenous business community has the benefit of improving the overall economy of the region."

After the Dubbo event in August, Walan Mayinygu Pop Up Hubs will also take place in Albury, Port Macquarie and Lismore.

For further information and to register participation in the Walan Mayinygu Indigenous Entrepreneurship Pop Up Hub,go to this site or the Walan Mayinygu Facebook site.

Media Contact: Wes Ward, 0417 125 795

Media Note:

For interviews on Monday 26 June with members of the Walan Mayinygu Indigenous Entrepreneurship Pop Up Hub project including Associate Professor Michelle Evans, contact CSU Media.

Small businesses go to Next Stage

Tuesday 13 Jun 2017

Prof Morgan Miles

A leading academic in entrepreneurship at Charles Sturt University (CSU) believes small businesses should do considerable groundwork before they expand.

CSU Professor of Entrepreneurship Professor Morgan Miles says that to grow, small business owners need a variety of new skills and information.

"They will need to identify opportunities and innovations, network and negotiate, target markets, develop effective selling strategies and communications, improve processes, gather financial intelligence, and prepare to manage larger teams," said Professor Miles, who is with the CSU Faculty of Business, Justice and Behavioural Sciences.

Professor Miles will address these topics and more in the 'Next Stage Growth Program' to be presented by CSU's CenWest Innovate project based in Bathurst.

"Participants will be invited to think about the fundamentals of being an entrepreneur, as well as marketing and managing the growth process," he said.

"We will need to go back to basics to assess our core business strategies, mission and expected growth.

"In addition, we will conduct market research, develop marketing strategies and learn how to use digital and social media to build and manage customer relations."

The six month program will cost $2 000 per business, with up to two participants per business. Scholarships are available.

To apply to participate in or for details regarding the program, phone 02 6338 4503 or send an email. The first course is due to commence on Thursday 20 July at CSU in Bathurst.

Media Contact: Wes Ward, 0417 125 795

Media Note:
For interviews with Professor Morgan Miles based in Bathurst, contact CSU Media.

EngFest 2017 builds in Bathurst

Thursday 1 Jun 2017

Engineering students Ms Georgia Sonter and Ms Aldrex CondinoCharles Sturt University (CSU) in Bathurst will be the centre of the local engineering world next week when it stages Engfest 2017.

Hosted by CSU Engineering, the four-day event includes activities for the central west community, industry and schools as well as CSU Engineering students.

This year, the degree is drawing international appeal by hosting staff from the renowned US-based Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) which are investigating what makes the internationally innovative CSU degree tick. This comes on top of a recent visit by delegates from the Minnesota Institute of Engineering in USA.

The central west community is invited to Community Day on Tuesday 6 June at 9.30amto hear from the national winning team from CSU in the 2016 Engineers Without Borders Challenge on what it takes to win the annual Challenge, which is for engineering students across Australia.

This year, the students have developed ideas that will address the needs of ten communities on Espiritu Santo Island in Vanuatu. These communities are seeking new income generating activities so the villagers no longer need to rely on income from harvesting the endangered coconut crab. Visitors can view this year's entries for the Challenge by first-year CSU student engineers throughout the day.

CSU Professor of Engineering Jim Morgan will then present his thoughts on transforming his traditional academic career into the extraordinary opportunity of starting a unique program while being allowed to break most of the academic rules. The lecture commences at 6pm on Tuesday 6 June and is part of CSU's Explorations Series public lectures.

Local engineering professionals and firms have been invited to Industry Day on Wednesday 7 Juneto view the Challenge exhibits by the student engineers in the morning, and will then discuss regional business, universities and entrepreneurship during an afternoon of professional development activities with CSU's CenWest Innovate, the Sydney School of Entrepreneurship and with the Institute of Public Works Engineering Australia.

CSU Expo Day on Thursday 8 June will include final tours of the first- and second-year exhibitions and the CSU Engineering building, which has been shortlisted for this year's NSW Architecture Awards.

Finally, high school students, teachers and parents can learn more about engineering and the CSU engineering degree at MyDay on Friday 9 June. Year-12 students will also receive an exclusive opportunity to apply for early entry into the 2018 course.

All activities during EngFest will be in CSU Engineering (building 1305), Panorama Ave, CSU in Bathurst.

The full program for EngFest 2017 is here, andregister here to attend various EngFest activities.

Media Contact: Wes Ward, 0417 125 795

Media Note:

For interviews with EngFest organisers including Professor Euan Lindsay and Dr Andrea Goncher, contact CSU Media.

Read more on the MIT visit here.

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