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CSU Albury-Wodonga celebrates NAIDOC week, Because Of Her We Can

Friday 13 Jul 2018

* CSU Albury-Wodonga presented two 2018 Charles Sturt University NAIDOC Awards

* The National NAIDOC theme this year is Because Of Her We Can

* Today we celebrated Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and their active and significant roles across the Albury-Wodonga region

Charles Sturt University (CSU) is proud to recognise women as part of the National Aboriginal and Islanders Day Observance Committee (NAIDOC) week theme this year, Because of Her We Can.

Head of Campus at CSU in Albury-Wodonga Dr Jennifer Munday said, “Indigenous and Torres Strait Islander people have kept the oldest continuing culture on the planet strong, and the women have been strong partners with their men in maintaining this cultural connection through generations”.

Two women from the Albury-Wodonga region were awarded with CSU NAIDOC week awards at a ceremony on campus today. Past and present CSU staff and students and community members attended.

Ms Liz Heta is a Senior Advisor, Aboriginal Engagement and Outcomes (Department of Health and Human Services), and this year spoke to the first year occupational therapy students at CSU in Albury-Wodonga about her thoughts on the impact of racism on occupational choice and engagement of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

Ms Heta’s presentation was a balance of being factual, honest and confronting as well as being personal, considered and sensitive to the needs to the first year students. Instead of being paid for her time, the money was used to purchase resources for a local preschool that provides education for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children.

Aunty Nancy Rooke is an Elder who has played an important role in the wider community.

She was a pioneer in bringing the Aboriginal community of Albury into TAFE and is a passionate advocate for education with her people.

The nomination noted, ‘because of her we can, as non-Indigenous people teach CSU students with confidence on how to connect with community’.

“Today we have celebrated just a few of the women who contribute, who work in a variety of ways, and are influencing and shaping our community,” Dr Munday said.

“We also acknowledge that there are many, many more local women that should be recognised, in addition to those whose stories we shared today.

“Charles Sturt University is so proud to celebrate the history, culture and achievements of our Indigenous and Torres Strait Islander staff, students and community members.

“It was delightful and an honour to be able to acknowledge and present awards to all these fabulous women making an impact across our communities.”

Media Contact: Kate Fotheringham, 0447 737 948

Media Note:

Contact CSU Media to arrange interviews.

CSU Dubbo celebrating NAIDOC week, Because Of Her We Can

Friday 13 Jul 2018

* CSU Dubbo presented two 2018 CSU NAIDOC Awards

* The NAIDOC theme this year is Because Of Her We Can

* Today we celebrated Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and the active and significant roles they play across the Dubbo region

Charles Sturt University (CSU) is proud to be recognising women, as part of the National Aboriginal and Islanders Day Observance Committee (NAIDOC) week theme this year, Because of Her We Can.

Head of Campus at CSU in Dubbo Ms Cathy Maginnis said, “Indigenous and Torres Strait Islander people have kept the oldest continuing culture on the planet strong and the women have been strong partners with their men in maintaining this cultural connection through generations”.

“Today we have celebrated just a few of the women who continue that work in a variety of ways, and are influencing and shaping our community.

“We also acknowledge that there are many, many more local women who should be recognised, in addition to those whose stories we shared today.”

Two wonderful women were given awards from the Dubbo region including a CSU staff member and key community member.

Associate Professor Jay Phillips has shown outstanding leadership in the development of Indigenous cultural competence within curriculum at CSU. She is also the Chair of the Indigenous Board of Studies and has been critical to the cultivation of best practice incorporating Indigenous histories, cultures and contemporary social realities across CSU’s main subjects.

Wiradjuri  man Lewis Burns and NAIDOC Week award nominee Dawn TowneyMs Dawn Towney works for the Department of Human Services, working in both Lightning Ridge and Dubbo. Throughout her career Ms Towney has developed a strong connection and networks in Lightning Ridge, Walgett and Dubbo. She speaks openly and honestly with the Indigenous community members when discussing options available to them.

Ms Towney is heavily involved in a number of interagency committees, including the Dubbo Koori Interagency Network. The nomination notes, ‘Dawn is a kind empathetic, straightforward individual who strives to create a more inclusive, respectful environment for herself, her kids, and her family and for the community.

“Charles Sturt University is so proud to celebrate the history, culture and achievements of our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander staff, students and community members,” Ms Maginnis said.

“It was delightful and an honour to be able to acknowledge and present awards to all these fabulous women who are making an impact across our communities.”

Media Contact: Kate Fotheringham, 63386251

Media Note:

CSU Bathurst celebrating NAIDOC week, Because Of Her We Can

Friday 13 Jul 2018

* CSU Bathurst presented nine 2018 Charles Sturt University NAIDOC Awards

* The National NAIDOC theme this year is Because Of Her We Can

* Today we celebrated Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and the active and significant roles they play across the Bathurst region

Charles Sturt University (CSU) is proud to recognise women as part of the National Aboriginal and Islanders Day Observance Committee (NAIDOC) Week. The theme this year is Because of Her We Can.

Acting Head of Campus at CSU in Bathurst Mr Peter Fraser said, “Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have kept the oldest continuing culture on the planet strong, and the women have been strong partners with their men in maintaining this cultural connection through generations”.

Nine women from the Bathurst region were presented with CSU NAIDOC week awards at a ceremony on campus today. Past and present CSU staff and students and community members attended the presentation.

Wiradyuri Elder and former CSU staff member Werribee Leanna Carr-Smith works tirelessly as a community advocate and educator. Werribee is an outstanding leader and has been responsible for embedding Wiradyuri content and wisdom into the local education sector, including language programs and cultural orientation immersions.

Dindima Gloria Rogers or ‘Aunty Gloria’, has been involved in the education and teaching of Wiradyuri culture and language. She also regularly conducts Welcome to Country in the Bathurst Wiradyuri area. She has been involved with CSU and the wider Bathurst community in a cultural advisory capacity for many years, giving her time and insight to many projects and initiatives.

Aunty Jill and CSU Vice-Chancellor Professor Andrew VannAunty Jill(Gunhimudha which means ‘mother to many’) is a local Elder who has fostered many, many children, not just Aboriginal children, over the last 20 plus years.

Aunty Jill has worked for her community behind the scenes for over 30 years in this area.  She holds Traditional Knowledge of Wiradyuri Country and is an accepted Wiradyuri Elder.  Aunty Jill has been one of the Elders keeping Councils and other community leaders accountable to their community and is a fierce community advocate.

Tracey Gale is a proud Wiradjuri woman who, through her personal values and strong work ethic, has made a positive impact in the local community. During her previous employment at CSU Tracey travelled the country gathering and collating research into businesses run by local Indigenous people and through this role gathered information in order to apply this knowledge at a local community level.  Tracey is a wealth of knowledge on how successful businesses are run and imparts this knowledge to local businesses to ensure future success.

Mrs Wyn Allen played   an instrumental role in setting up Wammarra in the early 1980’s when CSU was called Mitchell College of Advanced Education. She was the head of Wammarra for four years. She then moved to Canberra as a member of the House of Representatives Committee On Aboriginal Affairs. Later, she returned to Bathurst to work with the NSW Department of Fair Trading.  Mrs Allen has now retired and teaches Wiradyuri language at CSU.

Maureen Bates-Mckay and CSU Vice-Chancellor Professor Andrew VannMs Maureen Bates-McKay is a lawyer with legal aid and has demonstrated outstanding leadership in increasing access to justice in the Central West. Maureen works passionately for social justice and the community.

Ms Annette Gainsford has demonstrated outstanding leadership through the development of CSU Bachelor of Laws. The course is internationally unique in building the Indigenous cultural competence of its graduates.

Ms Gainsford led the development of Indigenous cultural competence of her colleagues within the CSU Centre for Law and Justice and contributed nationally to scholarships that recognise the place of Indigenous knowledge, cultures and histories within higher education.

Ms Julie Bennett has been nominated by her CSU students for showing them tremendous support. She is a mentor and an advocate who is always there for her students. They say, “Because of her, we can”.

Ms Jayarna Kay, a CSU student support officer at Wammarra Student Centre at CSU in Bathurst,was nominated via a specially produced video. The video said Ms Kay is a strong, confident and independent Aboriginal woman and is always empowering all females in all parts of her life, from work to her captaincy of the Orange Women’s Tigers AFL team.

Last year Jayarma was instrumental in developing CSU’s first Indigenous student conference in Dubbo, which included several workshops on leadership, which helped Indigenous students to excel in their studies and took on feedback to improve services for Indigenous students across CSU. The video nomination was also shown during the ceremony.

“Today we have celebrated just a few of the women who contribute, that work in a variety of ways, and are influencing and shaping our community,” Mr Fraser said.

“We also acknowledge that there are many, many more local women that should be recognised, in addition to those whose stories we shared today.”

“Charles Sturt University is so proud to celebrate the history, culture and achievements of our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander staff, students and community members.

“It was delightful and an honour to be able to acknowledge and present awards to all these fabulous women who are making an impact across our communities.”

Today’s event started with a smoking ceremony and also featured a talented local Aboriginal youth dance troupe.

Media Contact: Kate Fotheringham, 63386251

Media Note:

CSU Albury-Wodonga NAIDOC Scholar Award to PhD student

Thursday 12 Jul 2018

* PhD research explores why Aboriginal men of Albury-Wodonga under-utilise the local Aboriginal Health Service

* Culturally appropriate exercise and health education program achieved an 85 per cent attendance rate for the 10-week program

* Aim is for program to be transferable to other Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities

A Charles Sturt University (CSU) student and academic has been awarded the CSU Albury-Wodonga 2018 NAIDOC Scholar of the Year Award for his PhD research project.

Mr Brett Biles (pictured), a PhD student and lecturer in Indigenous health in the CSU School of Nursing, Midwifery and Indigenous Health in Albury-Wodonga, received the award for his PhD research project titled, ‘An exploration of a tailored cardiovascular exercise and education program for Aboriginal men in a regional centre’.

“It is humbling to receive this award as recognition for community-driven research,” Mr Biles said.

“It has been an amazing experience to research within my community and privilege the voices of local Aboriginal men.”

The award citation notes the three-pronged research was developed to explore the reasons why Aboriginal men of Albury-Wodonga under-utilise the local Aboriginal Health Service, to evaluate the effectiveness of a cardiovascular exercise and health education program, and to explore the men’s experience of this program.

As background, the citation notes that cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major health problem within Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

It states Mr Biles’ research has developed a culturally appropriate and respectful tailored exercise and health education program, that achieved an 85 per cent attendance rate for the 10-week exercise and health education program, which highlights the cultural appropriateness of the program.

Mr Biles aims for his culturally-appropriate and respectful tailored exercise and health education program to be transferable into other Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities.

The research is in its final stages of his PhD and Mr Biles looks forward to disseminating the findings of the research.

Media Contact: Bruce Andrews, 0418 669 362

Media Note:

Contact CSU Media to arrange interviews with Mr Brett Biles who is abased at CSU in Albury-Wodonga.

CSU Port Macquarie celebrates NAIDOC week, Because Of Her We Can

Wednesday 11 Jul 2018

* CSU in Port Macquarie has opened its nominations for the 2018 Charles Sturt University NAIDOC Awards

* The NAIDOC theme this year is Because Of Her We Can

* The awards celebrate Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and the active and significant roles they play across the Port Macquarie region

Charles Sturt University (CSU) is proud to recognise Indigenous women, as part of the National Aboriginal and Islanders Day Observance Committee (NAIDOC) Week theme this year, Because of Her We Can.

Acting Head of Campus at CSU in Port Macquarie Mr Peter Fraser said, “Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have kept the oldest continuing culture on the planet strong, and the women have been strong partners with their men in maintaining this cultural connection through generations”.

A lunchtime launch was held at CSU in Port Macquarie today at the Indigenous Student Centre. The nominations close on Wednesday 25 July with a ceremony to be held in August.

“Charles Sturt University is so proud to celebrate the history, culture and achievements of our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander staff, students and community members,” Mr Fraser said.

“Charles Sturt University encourages everyone to nominate Indigenous or Torres Strait Islander women they know who are influencing and shaping our community.

“As pillars of our society, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women have played and continue to play, active and significant roles at all levels of our community. Charles Sturt University is delighted and proud to be supporting these women.”

Nomination forms can be found here.

Media Contact: Kate Fotheringham, 63386251

Media Note:

Active Living Longer project in Bathurst seeks participants

Tuesday 10 Jul 2018

* CSU exercise research program in Bathurst seeks participants aged 50+

* Program supports long-term active and healthy lifestyles

* 22 per cent of Australian population will be aged 65 years and over by 2056

* CSU gym in Bathurst open to community members

The Active Living Longer (ALLong) program at Charles Sturt University (CSU) in Bathurst seeks men and women aged 50 years and over to participate in its ongoing wellbeing and exercise research.

Dr Eevon Stott (pictured), adjunct research fellow in the CSU School of Exercise Science, Sport and Health in Bathurst, said the (ALLong) program aims to help adults aged 50 years and over to pursue long-term active lifestyle through applied science, education, and technology.

“The broad aim of Active Living Longer is to empower the community to get healthier, and we have started with group exercise sessions at the gym at Charles Sturt University in Bathurst as a safe and supportive environment,” Dr Stott said.

“Statistics from the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare project that 22 per cent of the population will be aged 65 years and over by 2056. ALLong aims to assist this group to remain independent for longer.

“One of the exciting elements of this program for me is being able to test over time if a wellbeing program can not only assist with obvious improvements in physical ability, but if it can also affect mental or cognitive performance positively in older people. This is all about improving the overall quality of life as we age.”

There are three elements to the ALLong program:

Group Exercise Sessions: Guided by an exercise scientist and modified for each person to suit to their capabilities.

Research: Participants in the Group Exercise Sessions can opt to participate in research comprising physical, physiological, balance, and wellbeing measures.

Education: Since physical function is only a part of the equation of active and healthy ageing, the ALLong program will expand its offerings to include workshops covering topics about nutrition, and cognitive and mental health.

Participants pay a small fee to attend, and the funds generated go towards maintaining sustainability of the sessions. Those who opt in for the research component will be able to use their results from the research to track their own progress over time.

“My current participants paid for an eight-session pass to the group exercise sessions, but already two have ‘graduated’ to joining the gym,” Dr Stott said.

“In time we will offer Tai Chi classes at a cost of a gold coin donation, and an ‘Exercise 101’ theory and practical course.

“Further on, Active Living Longer hopes to collaborate with nutritionists to deliver workshops about eating for older adults, and I also plan to have an annual calendar of events to coincide with existing public awareness campaigns such as Seniors’ Week, Falls Prevention Week, and so on.”

“The research is longitudinal, and I take a set of measurements to provide to participants so their results motivate them to remain accountable to themselves as much as possible. The aim is to get them to repeat the measurement process every six months.”

Gym supervisor CSU in Bathurst, Mr Stephen Howell, commended the ALLong program saying, “It’s fantastic to see more and more people using this great facility. The gym staff have done a lot of work to improve the environment, plus we have purchased a lot more new equipment. The new extended opening hours have really hit a great note with our community patrons, and we can’t wait to get more members.”

ALLong begins in Bathurst, but the model will be expanded to include other Charles Sturt University campuses and regional communities in time.

For more information or to enrol in the ALLong program contact Dr Eevon Stott on 0408 721 752 or email estott@csu.edu.au

Media Contact: Bruce Andrews, 0418 669 362

Media Note:

Contact CSU Media to arrange interviews with Dr Eevon Stott.

CSU Wagga Wagga celebrating NAIDOC week, Because Of Her We Can

Tuesday 10 Jul 2018

* CSU Wagga Wagga presented 11  2018 Charles Sturt University NAIDOC Awards

* The NAIDOC theme this year is Because Of Her We Can

* Today we celebrated Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and the active and significant roles they play across the Wagga Wagga region

Charles Sturt University (CSU) is proud to be recognising women, as part of the National Aboriginal and Islanders Day Observance Committee (NAIDOC) week theme this year, Because of Her We Can.

Head of Campus at CSU in Wagga Wagga Ms Miriam Dayhew said, “For at least 65,000 years, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women have been strong partners with their men in maintaining this cultural connection through generations.

“Today we have celebrated just a few of the women who continue that work in a variety of ways, and are influencing and shaping our community.

“We also acknowledge that there are many, many more local women that should be recognised, in addition to those whose stories we shared today,”

Eleven wonderful women were given awards from the Wagga Wagga region including CSU staff, students and former students, and key community members.

Dr Faye McMillan is an inspiration to all Indigenous women and mothers. She was the first registered Australian Aboriginal Pharmacist, and was a founding member of Indigenous Allied Health Australia. Dr McMillan sits on many allied health boards, and is the Director of the Djirruwang Program Bachelor of Health Science (Mental Health).

Ms Catherine Maxwell has led the development of the Reconciliation Action Plan at CSU and has shown outstanding leadership in working with stakeholders from within the University and the wider community.

Aunty Kath Withers has supported educators in early childhood services to build their capacity and confidence to implement inclusive practices. This has included sharing her experiences and knowledge with educators through team meetings, Yarning circles, weaving workshops and service visits.

Aunty Isobel Reid is a survivor of the Stolen Generation. She was taken from her family at the age of seven and sent to the Cootamundra Domestic Training Home for Aboriginal Girls.

Aunty Isobel now Chairs the Coota Girls’ Corporation, and has been instrumental in the work for the survivors of the Stolen Generation. She has also been actively involved with the University and wider community through presenting her experiences as part of consultative processes.

Ms Ella Havelka is a descendant of the Wiradjuri people and a graduate of The Australian Ballet School.  In 2009 Ella made her first appearance with Bangarra Dance Theatre and continued dancing with the company for three years. A documentary centring on Ella and her dance journey was released in 2016 at the International Film Festival. Ella’s mother, a former CSU staff member, accepted her daughter’s award on her behalf.

Ms Tenayah Kelly has shown strong leadership while on secondment in the role of Programs Officer (Indigenous) in the Away from Base team, in the CSU Division of Student Services. Tenayah is continually working to improve the Indigenous student’s experience.

Ms Letetia Harris is a Wiradjuri woman who has worked relentlessly towards the restoration of the Wiradjuri language. Letetia is committed to her students, developing strong relationships, to provide each of them with encouragement, guidance and shares her cultural connection, the Wiradjuri language. The work Letetia does is described by her students as “deadly”.

Aunty Robyn McMillan has recently retired from CSU as an associate lecturer in the Bachelor of Health Science (Mental Health), where she taught and mentored an all-Indigenous cohort in Aboriginal culture, Aboriginal health and mental health. Aunty Robyn was also a mature age student when she completed her studies, inspiring mature age women with families who want to study and have a career.

Ms Kristy Wickey is a mother of three, and has just graduated from a Bachelor of Nursing and is going on to do further studies to become an Indigenous midwife. It was no easy feat, however Kristy managed study and children, and never complained and always had a smile on her face. Kristy is a leading example of what is possible.

Aunty Gail Manderson completed the Graduate Certificate in Wiradjuri Language, Culture and Heritage a few years ago as a mature age student. Since completing the certificate she is giving back to her community by working in local primary schools helping to keep the Wiradjuri language alive by teaching it.

Aunty Gail is also very involved in the University. She delivers ‘Welcomes to Country’, visits the Indigenous Student Centre, and holds workshops on cooking and weaving.

The final award recipient was Edna May ‘Mumma’ Jones who opened Ngungilanna, the CSU Wagga Campus Indigenous Student Centre in September 1994. Since its opening 723 Indigenous students have graduated from CSU in Wagga Wagga.

As part of the ceremony ‘Mumma’ Jones’s family accepted her posthumous award for her contribution to the academic success of so many CSU in Wagga Wagga students, and gave a heart-warming speech about the impact she had on so many lives.

A short student video was also shown about ‘what NAIDOC means to me’.

After the formal ceremony, people took part in a weaving class facilitated by Aunty Gail, and a barbecue hosted by the Student Representative Council.

“Charles Sturt University is so proud to celebrate the history, culture and achievements of our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander staff, students and community members,” Ms Dayhew said.

“It was delightful and an honour to be able to acknowledge and present awards to all these fabulous women who are making an impact across our communities.”

Media Contact: Kate Fotheringham, 63386251

Media Note:

Contact CSU Media to arrange interviews

New writer-in-residence at Booranga Writers’ Centre

Monday 9 Jul 2018

* Award winning author for Booranga Writers’ Centre residency

* Will present a free public lecture, and a writing workshop in Wagga Wagga

Award-winning author Ms Ellen van Neerven (pictured) has been announced as the third writer-in-residence at Booranga Writers’ Centre in Wagga Wagga in 2018.

Vice President of Booranga Writers’ Centre and senior lecturer in English in the CSU School of Humanities and Social Sciences in Wagga Wagga Dr Lachlan Brown said Ms van Neerven will be in-residence from Sunday 8 until Saturday 14 July.

“During her residency Ms van Neerven will deliver the ASAL Patrons Lecture at the Wagga Wagga Art Gallery on Friday 13 July, as well as conduct a writing workshop at Booranga on Saturday 14 July,” Dr Brown said.

“Ellen is a writer of Mununjali Yugambeh and Dutch heritage whose first book, Heat and Light (UQP, 2014), was the recipient of the David Unaipon Award, the Dobbie Literary Award and the NSW Premier’s Literary Awards Indigenous Writers Prize.

Heat and Light was also shortlisted for The Stella Prize, the Queensland Literary Award for State Significance, and the Readings Prize. Ellen was named as a Sydney Morning Herald‘s Best Young Australian Novelist in 2015.

“Ellen’s second book, a collection of poetry, Comfort Food (UQP, 2016) was shortlisted for the NSW Premier’s Literary Awards Kenneth Slessor Prize and Highly Commended for the 2016 Wesley Michel Wright Prize.”

Dr Brown said that until 2016 Ellen was the managing editor of black&write! Indigenous Writing and Editing Project at State Library of Queensland. She received the 2017 Queensland Writers Centre Johnno Award and the 2015 Express Media Award for Outstanding Contribution by a Young Person in Literary Arts. She currently lives and works in Melbourne.

The ASAL Patrons Lectures are hosted by ASAL with funding from the Copyright Agency,” Dr Brown said. “These lectures support emerging and distinguished Australian writers to travel to locations around Australia to present a public talk or lecture on a topic of his or her choosing for a broader public.

“By bringing Australian writers into a wide range of communities, Patrons Lectures aim to stimulate broad interest in Australian writing and facilitate deeper understanding between writers, the academy, secondary teachers and the reading public.”

Find more information about Ms van Neerven here: https://ellenvanneervencurrie.wordpress.com/

The ASAL Patrons Lecture is from 6pm to 8pm on Friday 13 July at the Wagga Wagga Art Gallery, Fitzmaurice Street, Wagga Wagga. While the public lecture is free, bookings are essential as seating is limited: RSVP

The Writing Workshop by Ms van Neerven is from 2pm to 4pm on Saturday 14 July at the Booranga Writers’ Centre, Mambarra Drive, Wagga Wagga. The workshop is free for members, a $10 donation is requested from non-members: RSVP

For more information contact Booranga Writers’ Centre Vice President, Dr Lachlan Brown, labrown@csu.edu.au or Booranga Creative Director, Kathryn Halliwell, director@booranga.com

Media Contact: Bruce Andrews, 0418 669 362

Media Note:

Contact CSU Media to arrange interviews with Dr Lachlan Brown.

MyDay in Wagga Wagga showcases CSU courses to future students

Wednesday 4 Jul 2018

  • * 320 high school students expected for MyDay at CSU in Wagga Wagga on Friday 6 July
  • * Free MyDay event is a great start to preparation for university

Senior high school students from across NSW and Victoria will attend a MyDay at Charles Sturt University (CSU) in Wagga Wagga on Friday 6 July to explore a range of courses and future study options.

CSU prospective student adviser Mr Andrew Connell said, “With around 350 students currently registered, we can expect about 320 students plus their parents to attend the MyDay.

“Students who have registered come from NSW and Victorian high schools, from as far as Melbourne and Sydney, as well as local schools across Wagga Wagga.

“The students who attend MyDay can learn about the courses we offer at Charles Sturt University in Wagga Wagga as well as general information about university and study. This free event is a great start to university preparation.

“Parents are also welcome to attend most sessions to learn more about courses and study at Charles Sturt University.”

Courses to be explored by the students include accounting and business, agriculture, teaching and education, animal and veterinary sciences,  oral health, medical imaging, medical science, nursing, agricultural and wine sciences, communication and creative industries, psychology and social work.

Media Contact: Wes Ward, 0417 125 795

Media Note:

Contact CSU Media to arrange interviews with CSU prospective student adviser Mr Andrew Connell.

Registrations commence at 9.30am at The Hub, Building 20, at CSU in Wagga Wagga. The event runs across the campus from 10am to 2.30pm.

MyDay showcases CSU courses to future students

Thursday 28 Jun 2018

* 60 high school students expected for MyDay at CSU in Dubbo on Thursday 5 July

* Free MyDay event is a great start to preparation for university

Senior high school students from across NSW will attend a MyDay at Charles Sturt University (CSU) in Dubbo on Thursday 5 July to explore a range of courses and future study options.

CSU prospective student adviser Ms Hilary Matchett said, “With around 54 students currently registered, we can expect about 60 students plus parents to attend the MyDay.

“The students who have registered come from a very broad area as well as our own region, from a range of schools from Forbes and Parkes, to Wellington and Coonamble.

“The students who attend MyDay can learn about the courses we offer at Charles Sturt University as well as general information about university and study. This free event is a great start to university preparation.

“Parents are also welcome to attend most sessions to learn more about courses and study at Charles Sturt University.”

Courses to be explored by the students include nursing, social work, and teaching and education.

Media Contact: Bruce Andrews, 0418 669 362

Media Note:

Contact CSU Media to arrange interviews with CSU prospective student adviser Ms Hilary Matchett.

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