Layers of history in the shadow of Bathurst’s Wahluu

22 NOVEMBER 2019

Layers of history in the shadow of Bathurst’s Wahluu

A Charles Sturt University research group has produced a brochure − Land and Learning in the Shadow of Wahluu − that maps the layers of natural history and development of the University’s site in Bathurst.

  • New publication maps the layers of natural history and development of the University’s site in Bathurst
  • The brochure considers human impact on the environment in the age of the Anthropocene

A Charles Sturt University (Charles Sturt) research group has produced a brochure − Land and Learning in the Shadow of Wahluu − that maps the layers of natural history and development of the University’s site in Bathurst.

The research team delved into the rich story of human interaction with the tract of land on which the University now stands.

The team, led by sociologist Dr Ann Lazarsfeld-Jensen, and researchers Ms Vianne Tourle and PhD candidate Ms Tracy Sorensen, hoped to inspire deeper examination of the past to inform the future.

Dr Lazarsfeld-Jensen said, “In recorded history, an agricultural research station, known as The Experiment Farm, was the first significant development, lending its name to Research Station Drive, which today is the western boundary entry to the University.

“But long before The Experiment Farm was established in 1895, the Wiradyuri people pursued cultural learning on the land through storytelling, on their way to ceremonies on Wahluu, also known as Mount Panorama.

“The Farm’s technological excellence in developing sustainable crops for the young colony helped it carve a place in history through the development of the Granny Smith apple and drought resistant crops.

“A second significant layer of history was the opening of Bathurst Teachers' College in 1951 with the teacher education program that supplied teachers to the schools of rural Australia.

“The Teachers’ College became Mitchell Collage of Advanced Education in 1971, and became Charles Sturt University in 1989.”

Dr Lazarsfeld-Jensen said the history of the campus space, and the layers of cultural and educational endeavour pursued here, are now represented in vignettes and images in the newly released brochure Land and Learning in the Shadow of Wahluu.

“The publication considers the age of the Anthropocene – human impact on the environment – and points to the precious landmarks at the end of Research Station Drive, awaiting a new purpose,” she said.

The brochure Land and Learning in the Shadow of Wahluu will be launched at 10.30am Wednesday 27 November at The Cowshed (building 1298) at Charles Sturt University in Bathurst.

The project was a partnership between the Charles Sturt School of Biomedical Sciences, the Friends of the Bathurst Agricultural Research Station Inc, and the Bathurst and District Branch of the National Trust, and was funded by a Charles Sturt University Sustainability Research Seed Grant.

To RSVP please phone Ms Vianne Tourle on 6338 4953 or 0419 213 650, or email vtourle@csu.edu.au

Media Note:

To arrange interviews with Dr Ann Lazarsfeld-Jensen, contact Bruce Andrews at Charles Sturt Media on mobile 0418 669 362 or news@csu.edu.au

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