First Nations ‘Winhangarra’ event holds important place on annual university calendar

24 MAY 2024

First Nations ‘Winhangarra’ event holds important place on annual university calendar

Charles Sturt University in Orange hosted the annual Winhangarra event on Friday 17 May.

Charles Sturt University in Orange hosted the Winhangarra event on Friday 17 May, which was a celebration of First Nations culture and its integral place as part of the University’s ethos.

Drawn from Wiradjuri language, ‘Winhangarra’ means to hear, think and listen. The event is designed to introduce new students to First Nations cultural and equity issues in preparation for the workforce.

The event ran from 12pm until 2pm and included an array of First Nations cultural activities, such as a yarning session, cultural sharing, cultural dancing and First Nations education. A Welcome to Country was conducted by Uncle Dale Carr and there were also several talks from Charles Sturt staff and a student.

Pro Vice-Chancellor First Nations Engagement Professor Tony Dreise opened the event, welcoming attendees while outlining the importance of introducing new students to First Nations practices and ways of being at the University.

“First Nations culture is integral to this country, and we are proud advocates of First Nations empowerment, equity and opportunity at Charles Sturt University,” Professor Dreise said.

Charles Sturt Director of External Engagement in Orange and Bathurst Ms Julia Andrews was delighted to host the Winhangarra event again at the Orange campus.

“Winhangarra is an important annual date on our University’s calendar,” Ms Andrews said.

“It’s a chance for everyone to come together to celebrate our wonderful First Nations staff and students, while deepening the understanding of First Nations culture and practices.” 


Presentations were also delivered by Deputy Mayor of Orange City Council Councillor Gerald Power and a dentist from the Charles Sturt Dental and Oral Health Clinic Dr Amika Garcia, along with a representative from the Orange Aboriginal Medical Service.

New students also heard from a First Nations second-year student studying the Bachelor of Clinical Science (Medicine)/ Doctor of Medicine at the Charles Sturt School of Rural Medicine, Ms Maddie Johnson.

Attendees were able to ask questions during a panel discussion, which was led by the speakers.

A barbeque lunch followed, which was a chance for students to meet and greet some of the Charles Sturt staff, including from the First Nations teams.

The event is the result of collaboration between the Charles Sturt Faculty of Science and Health student services and First Nations community members.

Organisers also hope to advance health practice, build aspiration and capacity with the student body, and strengthen community relationships.

ENDS

Media Note:

For further information or interviews, contact Trease Clarke at Charles Sturt Media on mobile 0409 741 789 or via news@csu.edu.au

Photo captions:

Main image, L to R:

Back row:

Charles Sturt Pro Vice-Chancellor First Nations Engagement Professor Tony Dreise; Ms Jayanna Dixon; Mr Chris Jones; Orange City Council Deputy Mayor, Cr Gerald Power; Mr Jyson Jones; First Nations Pathways in Health Project Manager Ms Kirsty Towle; Lecturer in Problem based learning, School of Dentistry and Medical Sciences, Dr Sid Parissi.

Front row:

Master Tyren Dixon

Inset image:

Ms Jayanna Dixon, Mr Jyson Jones, and Master Tyren Dixon

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Orange Charles Sturt University Indigenous Society and Community