Charles Sturt student awarded Aboriginal Early Childhood Teaching scholarship

28 AUGUST 2019

Charles Sturt student awarded Aboriginal Early Childhood Teaching scholarship

Charles Sturt awards $3 million in scholarships and grants annually to assist students of all backgrounds to access higher education.

  • Charles Sturt student from Orange awarded scholarship to assist with study and living costs
  • Charles Sturt awards $3 million in scholarships and grants to students annually

A Charles Sturt University (Charles Sturt) student from Orange has been awarded an Aboriginal Early Childhood Teaching scholarship to assist with study and living costs.

Ms Taleise Pickavance (pictured), a Bachelor Educational Studies (Early Childhood and Primary) student in her second year of study at Charles Sturt in Bathurst, was thrilled to be awarded the scholarship and advises that other students should definitely apply.

“The scholarship relieved me from financial hardship and from stress because I was seriously considering dropping out of university,” she said.

“Before I received the scholarship, I was under a lot of stress living by myself and juggling the commitment of a job to support myself and finding the time to study.

“With the help of the scholarship, I was able to pay my car registration so I could drive over to Bathurst to study, and buy educational resources.”

Ms Pickavance said the application process was simple and provided an opportunity to reflect on your experiences and passion for your studies in your answers.

Charles Sturt awards $3 million in scholarships and grants annually to assist students of all backgrounds to access higher education.

Director of the Charles Sturt Advancement Office Ms Sarah Ansell said despite having more than 300 scholarships available to students, many of those in the student community overlook them as a way to ease the costs associated with study.

“Some scholarships go unawarded because they don’t get applicants,” she said.

“Many students do not apply for scholarships because they assume they won’t be successful or are not eligible for financial support.

“If you’re working to support yourself and this cuts into study time, that’s financial hardship.”

Ms Ansell advises students to answer all questions whether they think they apply to them or not and added it is important to take the time with the application by responding with more than one sentence.

“A couple of sentences will increase your chances, because donors are interested in the student’s story and background,” Ms Ansell said.

The full list of scholarships and grants can be found on the Charles Sturt Scholarship website.

Media Note:

For interviews with Ms Taleise Mary Pickavance or Ms Sarah Ansell, contact Charles Sturt Media at news@csu.edu.au.

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