Understanding security and policing intelligence

27 MAY 2011

As the tenth anniversary approaches of the September 11 attacks on the United States in 2001, a new book by a CSU academic examines developments in national security and policing intelligence, and the consequences and evolving implications for organisations and individuals responsible for intelligence gathering and analysis.

As the tenth anniversary approaches of the September 11 attacks on the United States in 2001, a new book by a Charles Sturt University (CSU) academic examines developments in national security and policing intelligence, and the consequences and evolving implications for organisations and individuals responsible for intelligence gathering and analysis.
 
The book, Intelligence and Intelligence Analysis, by Mr Patrick F Walsh, a senior lecturer in criminal intelligence at the CSU Australian Graduate School of Policing in Manly, will be published on Tuesday 31 May.
 
“The discipline of intelligence for national security and policing – how it is gathered, analysed and applied – is a very broad, dynamic and constantly evolving field which is trying to respond to an increasingly complex security environment,” Mr Walsh said.
 
“The attacks on the United States on 11 September 2001, and subsequent attacks around the world, have prompted developments in the way in which intelligence services function, interact and adapt.
 
“In Intelligence and Intelligence Analysis I aim to track and explain these developments for a broad audience which includes intelligence practitioners, managers, and students.
 
“The book examines a range of theoretical and practical issues under three broad themes; applying intelligence, understanding structures, and developing a discipline.
 
“I present case studies derived from my interviews with intelligence leaders, managers and practitioners in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the United Kingdom, and the United States, to identify good practice across nations and within and between agencies which might be usefully applied elsewhere.
 
“This includes in new and emerging areas such as corrections, bio-security, private industry, and regulatory environments.”
 
Other topics examined in Intelligence and Intelligence Analysis include: understanding intelligence models; strategic management challenges of intelligence; intelligence capacity building; and the ethical dimensions of intelligence practice.

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