CSU benefits from US Study Abroad boom

15 DECEMBER 2003

At a time when overseas study programs are more popular than ever in the United States, a potential partnership between Charles Sturt University and the University of Delaware in the US is likely to be formed.

At a time when overseas study programs are more popular than ever in the United States, a potential partnership between Charles Sturt University (CSU) and the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources at the University of Delaware in the US is likely to be formed.

The first group of visiting Delaware students will be welcomed to CSU in January 2004 – an introduction that paves the way for others to return under the University’s Study Abroad program.

More than 20 students will arrive on the Wagga Wagga Campus on Monday 12 January where they will study local animal production issues and leadership opportunities through hands-on experiences, farm visits, field trips and local sight seeing.

The potential partnership is being fostered by Emeritus Professor Ted Wolfe from the CSU School of Agriculture, who visited the University of Delaware in March this year.

“Delaware’s College of Agriculture is strong in intensive livestock production, nutrient and pesticide management, resource economics and agribusiness – the link could benefit similar courses at CSU,” Professor Wolfe said.

A recent Institute of International Education (IIE) survey indicated Study Abroad is more popular than ever among US students, with many recognising “preparation for success in a global future needs to include overseas study” – a benefit that, Professor Wolfe says, needs to be realised by more Australian tertiary students. 

“It is an invaluable opportunity for our students to gain an international insight from these visitors – international exchange is important for CSU students, academics, community groups, local agribusiness and agricultural institutions that are assisting the University in gaining a global perspective. Such an experience is also highly regarded by potential employers,” Professor Wolfe said.

Study Abroad programs allow students to complete one or two semesters at an international higher education institution, while gaining credit toward their degree at home.

The IIE report also showed Australia experienced a 17 per cent increase in American students taking part in Study Abroad programs in 2003, with short term study tours also becoming increasingly popular.

The University of Delaware has the seventh largest Study Abroad program of all United States universities and is located near farming country, as well as New York and Washington DC. 
During their three-week stay, the American students will visit agribusiness firms and farms in the Goulburn, Yass, Wagga Wagga, Albury-Wodonga and Griffith districts. 

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Wagga Wagga Charles Sturt University International