French input into Australian wine quality

17 JUNE 2004

A greater understanding of a defect in wine quality or wine oxidation is expected to flow from a year long research project by a French wine scientist at CSU's National Wine and Grape Centre.

A greater understanding of a defect in wine quality or wine oxidation is expected to flow from a year long research project by a French wine scientist at the National Wine and Grape Centre (NWGIC) at Charles Sturt University (CSU) in Wagga Wagga. 

Dr Chantal Maury from Toulouse in France studied the chemistry of white wine oxidation by examining a range of factors such as how ascorbic acid, an anti-oxidant, can actually bring out enhanced oxidation.

Environmental and storage conditions, including light exposure, temperature and the colour of the wine bottle, were also examined by the French researcher. 

"The outcomes of Dr Maury’s research will be of value to the wine industry as it seeks to maintain wine in a high quality condition,” said NWGIC Director Professor Geoff Scollary. 

“Dr Maury had made an outstanding contribution to the Centre’s research activities, particularly her skills in the analysis of wine phenolic compounds. She has made significant advances in our understanding of the factors that impact on wine oxidation,” added Professor Scollary.

Ahead of her return to France in July, Dr Maury will present her final seminar, titled “White Wine Oxidation: A Swansong” on Tuesday 22 June from 9.30am until 10.30am in the School of Wine and Food Sciences, Ron Potter Centre, near the CSU Winery, Wagga Wagga. 

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Wagga Wagga Charles Sturt University