CSU recognised with Indigenous awards

8 OCTOBER 2012

A project designed to reconnect Indigenous youth to the Wiradjuri language and culture, run through Charles Sturt University (CSU), has been recognised in the 2012 Indigenous Higher Education Advisory Council Elders Awards.

A project designed to reconnect Indigenous youth to the Wiradjuri language and culture, run through Charles Sturt University (CSU), has been recognised in the 2012 Indigenous Higher Education Advisory Council Elders Awards.
 
CSU's Special Adviser Indigenous Affairs, Mr Gary Shipp, said the Wiradjuri Language and Cultural Heritage Recovery Project was created in response to the urgent need to preserve the Wiradjuri language and culture.
 
“In both content and practice, the program we offer emphasises the necessity of strong, respectful community partnerships,” he said.
 
“As a university, we are in a position to forge local pathways to reconciliation, where all of us can work together to contribute to local knowledge and identity, from a distinctly Aboriginal perspective.
 
“As a team, we believe that this project will have benefits for the Wiradjuri culture for years to come, and that the most important role it plays is in the reconnection of our kids to their community and their culture.”
 
This year's awards will also honour Uncle Ray Peckham for his “outstanding work with Charles Sturt University and significant contribution and commitment to education and social justice outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people over many years”.
 
Mr Peckham's involvement in education began as a young boy when, at age 12, he listened to the late Mr William Ferguson speak in Muller Park, North Dubbo.
 
Mr Ferguson talked about the importance of education to the Aboriginal people of Australia and explained to Mr Peckham that Aboriginal people had to go to school and stay at school so they could take their rightful place as equals in society.
 
After many years as a passionate and successful advocate for Aboriginal people, Mr Peckham moved to Dubbo where he later began to work with CSU’s Centre for Indigenous Studies.
 
“Mr Peckham has become an integral link between the Indigenous community, schools and Elders groups, acting as a link between the Centre, the Aboriginal community and the Elders,” Mr Shipp said.
 
“Charles Sturt University is very pleased to see the work of both the Wiradjuri Language and Cultural Heritage Recovery Project and Mr Peckham honoured in this way and would like to congratulate everyone involved for these awards.”

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Canberra Dubbo Charles Sturt University Teaching and Education Indigenous Society and Community