CSU researcher: Can coloured rice help people with obesity?


Thursday 24 May 2018

* Charles Sturt University (CSU) research is investigating the therapeutic effect of coloured rice for obesity and related diseases.

* The research is examining if the bioactive compounds in coloured rice can help reduce blood clotting, inflammation and chemical damage to cells.

* Preliminary studies have shown positive results and volunteers are needed for the next stage of the PhD research in Wagga Wagga.

Volunteers are needed for research at Charles Sturt University (CSU) in Wagga Wagga into the therapeutic effects of coloured rice for obesity and related diseases, like diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

CSU PhD student Ms Esther Callcott’s research is focused on the bioactive compounds found in whole-grain coloured rice.

“Whole grain rice, especially purple and red varieties are rich in antioxidants,” Ms Callcott said.

“My preliminary research, using stem cells in the laboratory and testing the compounds on blood samples, has shown the compounds may be helpful in reducing inflammation and free radicals.

“These positive results have given us the confidence to move ahead with the next stage of the research and we need volunteers to take part in a study in Wagga Wagga examining the impact of eating coloured rice.”

The researchers would like to hear from people who are obese (Body Mass Index of greater than 30)

* People need to be non-smokers, aged between 18 and 65, who are not pregnant and who don't suffer any chronic diseases.

* People will be required to take part in the study for one day each week, for four weeks.

* They’ll be asked to eat some rice and give blood samples.

* More information about the study is available here.

The research is through the Australian Research Council (ARC) Industrial Transformation Training Centre for Functional Grains (FGC) and is supervised by Dr Abishek Santhakumar and Professor Chris Blanchard from CSU's School of Biomedical Sciences.

For more information or to take part in the study people can email Ms Callcott, ecallcott@csu.edu.au

Ms Callcott was awarded a scholarship by FGC. Funded by the Australian Government through the ARC’s Industrial Transformation Training Centres scheme, the FGC is administered by Charles Sturt University and is an initiative of the Graham Centre for Agricultural Innovation.

-ends-


ends

Media contact: Emily Malone , 0439 552 385

Media Note:

Ms Callcott is based at CSU in Wagga Wagga, to arrange interviews contact Graham Centre Communications officer Ms Emily Malone on 0439 552 385 or email emalone@csu.edu.au

The research has been approved by CSU's Human Research Ethics Committee.