Do you ‘phub’? - Smartphone use research needs survey participants

13 SEPTEMBER 2022

Do you ‘phub’? - Smartphone use research needs survey participants

Charles Sturt University academics are conducting research on the use of smartphones in social situations and are looking for participants to complete online surveys.

  • Charles Sturt University researchers will examine the effects of using Smartphones during social situations, known as ‘phubbing’ ('phone snubbing')
  • Two categories of participants – parents, and 18 to 24 year-olds – are needed to complete two separate surveys
  • Previous research has found ‘phubbing’ negatively affects satisfaction with life, the quality of relationships, communication skills, and may make the person being phubbed feel less valued as an individual

Charles Sturt University academics are conducting research on the use of smartphones in social situations and are looking for participants to complete online surveys.

The researchers, Associate Professor Yeslam Al-Saggaf in the Charles Sturt School of Computing, Mathematics and Engineering and Dr Rachel Hogg (pictured above 'phubbing', and below) in the Charles Sturt School of Psychology, said the aim of this study is to investigate the use of smartphones in social situations and how this use impacts people.

“Previous research has shown that the use of smartphone during face-to-face conversations, known as ‘phubbing’ ('phone snubbing'), is associated with detrimental effects,” Professor Al-Saggaf said.

“This research is important not only because it will raise awareness about the detrimental effects associated with use of smartphones in social situations but also because it will consider effective strategies for addressing this problem.”

Lead researcher Professor Al-Saggaf noted other research has found ‘phubbing’ negatively affected satisfaction with life, the quality of relationships, communication skills, and interpersonal ‘mattering’ (that is, whether they matter to the other person).

Other effects include ostracism, loneliness, anxiety, depression, smartphone addiction, cyberbullying, withdrawal, aggression, lower self-evaluation, academic procrastination, and poor academic performance.

Dr Hogg said it is important that this research will consider effective strategies for addressing this problem, because phubbing is not something we are likely to stop doing anytime soon.

“The ramifications of it may also change over time depending on phone etiquette and the perceived normalcy of the behaviour in different social settings, relationships, and contexts,” she said.

“We seek two categories of research participants - parents of one or more Smartphone users, and Smartphone users aged 18-24 years - who will complete separate surveys.

“Participation is voluntary, anonymous, and involves completing a short survey that should take approximately ten minutes to complete.”

There are separate surveys and potential participants should meet the following criteria:

  • Parents of one or more smartphone users - please go to this link.
  • Smartphone users aged 18-24 years - please go to this link.

See more information about the ‘phubbing’ research project ‘The use of smartphones in social situations and its impacts’.

The research survey closes at the end of November 2022, and results are expected to be available in the first quarter of 2023.

Media Note:

To arrange interviews with Associate Professor Yeslam Al-Saggaf and Dr Rachel Hogg contact Bruce Andrews at Charles Sturt Media on mobile 0418 669 362 or via news@csu.edu.au

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